Advanced Study Opportunities (Capstones)

Advanced Study Opportunities (Capstones) are intended to be the culmination of your undergraduate education in the Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. A Capstone Course may allow you to attain an extraordinarily high degree of skill in your area of focus, or to complete a substantial project on a theme or issue that you find deeply significant. By completing a Capstone Course in your final years at TDPS and UCB, you will bring together your undergraduate experience with a moment of synthesis and celebration – a marking moment. *Please note that most Capstone Courses have pre-requisites and application procedures, as described below.  

Students take Capstone Courses in order to plan and carry out a specific research project; synthesize their diverse educational interests; achieve a certain level of mastery in their area of focus in theater, dance, or performance studies; or add a significant accomplishment to their résumés so that they are well prepared to enter the professional world after graduation from UC Berkeley. Some Capstone Courses are focused on reading, critical thinking, and academic writing; others emphasize performing or creating new works for the stage; still others allow students to teach, or travel, or intern with professionals in the working world. Students choose the Capstone Course that best suits their academic and artistic interests, and will give them the experience that they need to transition successfully from Berkeley into the world of graduate study or professional work.

Do you need help discerning which Capstone Courses or Opportunities are your next step?
Contact: Michael Mansfield, Undergraduate Academic Advisor
15B Dwinelle Hall // Office Hours: 1-4, M-F
510-643-4050 // tdpsugadvisor@berkeley.edu

Advanced Study Opportunities (Capstones) Available:

THR 166

THEATER 166 – Undergraduate Research Seminar

Building upon Students’ R1A and R1B writing courses and other TDPS coursework the Undergraduate Research Seminar (URS) is designed to provide students at all levels with the knowledge and tools they need to conduct advanced research for honors theses, independent study research papers, essays, and synthesis papers.

While the emphasis on traditional scholarly research, practice-as-research is also covered in this course.

With each student working with a familiar topic that they feel passionate about, we will practice skills such as crafting research questions, finding sources, engaging and responding critically to sources, identifying key concepts and conducting interviews. We will also draft a thesis statement and a paper outline based on the thesis statement. Final projects include the production of an annotated bibliography that includes a minimum of five sources and a research proposal in both written form and as a lively Pecha Kucha-like slideshow. Throughout the semester we will also practice project management including developing an idea of reasonable scale, sticking to research timelines and interacting with faculty advisors. Class format includes group instruction, peer review and one-on- one student advising. Class time will also be allotted to working on assignments.

While the URS is open to all students, it is required for TDPS students conducting departmentally–approved Honors Projects. Students are strongly encouraged to complete Theater 166 before proposing an Honors Project and to use the written research proposal completed in this class for the honors application process. TDPS students who must take the URS and the first semester of their “Written-Only” Honors Project concurrently have the option of dovetailing their final assignments for H195A and 166. The student may use their annotated bibliography in 166 as the foundation for the annotated bibliography required at the end of the first semester of their Honors Project 195A. They can also expand their thesis proposal in 166 into the ten-page proposal required in H195A to progress to the second semester of the Honors Project.

TDPS students who must take the URS and are the first semester of their “Honors Essay and Production” Honors Project concurrently have the option of substituting the introductory section of their 25-40 page Honors Project Essay for H195A for the written research proposal in 166. They may also use their second semester H195B Production Project as their topic for the end-of- the-semester slide show in 166.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • R1A and R1B or the equivalent.
  • This course is required for seniors who have a departmentally-approved Honors Thesis.
  • The course is recommended for sophomores or juniors who are planning to do an Honors Project, capstone project, or independent study later on in their student careers.
  • Enrollment is limited.

Faculty Supervision:

Class meets once a week.

Application Submission:

Enrollment is limited. To be considered for the course, send an email to Jenefer Johnson at jenefer@berkeley.edu indicating your name, year, major/minor, phone number, and email address. If you have already been approved to do an Honors Thesis, please include a copy of your proposal. If you intend to apply for an honors project or independent study in the future, please indicate the topic(s) you are interested in exploring.

THR 169

THEATER 169 – ADVANCED THEATER PRACTICE

Theater 169 involves participation in advanced technical theater practice associated with departmental theater and dance productions. This could include lead, head, or coordinator positions with technical run crew for live performance in one of the following areas: lighting, sound, video, properties, costumes, make-up, scenery, deck, or rail. This could also include advanced application of workshop activities (fabrication, treatment, and installation) in one or more of the following areas: costume, hair, make-up, scenery, properties, lighting, video, and sound for live performance.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • Intended for a student who has completed introductory level application of theater practice and is training in advanced techniques and applications and/or assuming additional responsibilities in relation to production.

Faculty Supervision:

Mentoring opportunity with one of the design faculty and/or staff on your project.

Application Submission:

Email Wil Leggett, the Production Manager, at willeggett@berkeley.edu to discuss possible course assignments. Plan one semester ahead: you may contact the Production Manager as early as the first week of the semester to discuss enrollment for the following semester.

THR 171

THEATER 171 – THEATER PERFORMANCE: AUDITION TECHNIQUE

For the advanced actor preparing for graduate school auditions.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • Two-semester commitment required, unless a December graduation is anticipated.
  • Limited enrollment.

Faculty Supervision:

Participants work in individual coaching sessions with the instructor.

Application Submission:

Students are admitted by interview and with the recommendation of the acting faculty. If you are interested in interviewing, watch for a sign-up sheet on the Callboard in early September. If you have questions about the course, contact Lura Dolas at lura@berkeley.edu.

THR 176

THEATER 176 – SUPERVISED THEATRICAL DESIGN

Advanced students of lighting design are provided experience, structure, and support in the practical application of design to the stage in departmental productions.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • Have completed 175A and 175B or the equivalent experience.

Faculty Supervision:

Mentoring opportunity with the lighting design faculty on campus or off campus.

Application Submission:

Contact Jack Carpenter at jackcal39@berkeley.edu for information about participation and course control numbers.

 

THR 179

THEATER 179 – SUPERVISED THEATRICAL DESIGN

Advanced students who have taken TDPS scenic design and costume design classes are offered opportunities to participate in practical scenographic explorations by taking responsibility for designing, or assistant-designing department shows. This includes the designing of costumes, scenery, projections and special properties. The level of experience and commitment required varies so each project is tailored to the needs and abilities of each student and their particular production context.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • Have completed 173A/B or 174A/B or the equivalent experience.

Faculty Supervision:

Mentoring opportunity with the set design or costume design faculty on campus or off campus.

Application Submission:

Contact the instructor, Annie Smart, at anniesmart@berkeley.edu well in advance for information about participation and for CCN and other protocols.

THR 180

THEATER 180 – THEATRICAL REALIZATION OF DANCE

This course gives you credit for participating in Berkeley Dance Project (an audition is required to be cast in BDP). This course relates choreography to theatrical presentation. Laboratory hours are spent in attendance at rehearsal, coaching sessions, and the performance of Berkeley Dance Project. Faculty and guest artists cast and choreograph these dance works.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • Auditions are open to all students.

Faculty Supervision:

Pieces presented in Berkeley Dance Project are choreographed by a faculty member or professional guest artist.

Application Submission:

Auditions are held towards the end of each fall semester. Watch for information and sign up for a time on the TDPS Callboard.

 

THR 181

THEATER 181 – THEATRICAL REALIZATION OF DRAMATIC TEXTS

This course gives you credit for participating in TDPS Playhouse and/or Studio productions (auditions required to be cast). This course relates dramatic texts or choreography to theatrical presentation. The lectures are based on the analysis of the work being presented. Laboratory hours are spent in attendance at rehearsal, coaching sessions, and the performance of the play or concert. Playhouse and Studio Productions are directed by faculty, guest artists, or advanced students.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • Auditions are open to all students.

Faculty Supervision:

Playhouse and Studio Productions are directed by faculty, guest artists, or advanced students.

Application Submission:

Auditions for fall shows are held the first two weeks of classes; auditions for spring shows are held towards the end of each fall semester and in the first week of the spring semester. Watch for information and sign up for a time on the TDPS Callboard.

THR 195A/B

THEATER 195A/B – DEPARTMENTAL HONORS COURSE

The H195 Honors Project is the centerpiece and culmination of an outstanding career in the Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies. Projects are approved each year based on available resources and funds, but more importantly, projects are approved in recognition of excellent work within the major and strong, engaging proposals that seek to answer a research question or experiment. Projects can be accomplished as 1) Written Thesis-Only or 2) Written Honors Essay and Production. Honors Projects are restricted to Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies majors only. The H195A/B Written Honors Project may be undertaken in either a Spring/Fall or Fall/Spring cycle. The H195A/B Essay-Production Honors Project is only available in the Fall/Spring cycle.

1. Written Thesis-Only

The first semester (Theater 166 + H195A, total of 4 units) is an intensive critical study of some aspect of theater, dance, or performance studies. Students enroll in Theater 166: Undergraduate Research Seminar (2 units) alongside Theater H195A: Honors Thesis or Project (2 units). The semester culminates in drafting a detailed thesis proposal – a ten-page synopsis of the thesis, followed by an annotated bibliography of studies consulted. The Faculty Supervisor must approve the work completed, and approve the student to complete the thesis in the second semester.

The second semester (H195B, 4 units) is spent writing the thesis based on the previous semester’s research. Midway through the second semester, the student will submit a draft of 40-60 pages to their committee (Faculty Supervisor and an additional Senate faculty member selected by the student), who will read and comment on the draft. This final draft will be the document on which the student receives a final grade for the thesis.

2. Written Honors Essay And Production

The first semester (Theater 166 + H195A, total of 4 units) is an intensive critical study of some aspect of theater, dance, or performance studies. This semester culminates in writing a 25 – 40 page critical, historical, and/or theoretical Honors Essay. The essay considers a significant problem, and is evaluated as a free-standing project – that is, the Honors Essay will be treated as a critical text in its own terms, not only as preparation for the second-semester production.

The second semester (H195B, 4 units) is a performance/production project that engages with the Honors Essay, that culminates in directing a play, choreographing a dance piece, designing a production, writing a play, staging a costume show, etc.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • You must be a TDPS major to pursue an Honors Project.
  • UCB GPA of 3.3
  • This commitment covers a full academic year, with each semester carrying four units of credit; credit cannot be awarded for one semester without the other.
  • Before beginning the Honors Thesis, at least two of the three upper division Performance Studies courses must have been completed and the last one will be by the end of the first semester of the Honors Project.
  • To be eligible for H195A/B with both a written thesis and a production component in Theater, you must have completed 60: Introduction to Technical Theater & Production and 162: Directing before the Honors Project year begins.
  • To be eligible for H195A/B with both a written thesis and a production component in Dance, you must have completed 60: Introduction to Technical Theater & Production and 146A and 146B: Choreography.
  • Specific disciplines (such as design, directing, choreography, etc.) carry with them certain expectations as to course work completed or to be completed.

Faculty Supervision:

Students select a Faculty Supervisor to mentor their work throughout the year. If you are pursuing an Honors Essay and Production and wish to have two supervisors during the year, one for the research semester and one for the production semester, you may choose two different faculty members. The actual course content and format of the H195 sequence depend upon the student and the Faculty Supervisor(s). In the past, Honors Projects have encompassed directorial, choreography, design, performance, research, and playwriting projects.

Students are encouraged to start discussing projects (both the possibilities and the limitations of what you envision) with potential Faculty Supervisors as early as possible, normally in September or October. Students are required to submit and discuss a rough draft of their proposal with a Faculty Supervisor at least two weeks before the deadline for proposals. Faculty Supervisors will not sign proposals that have not been reviewed with them before the deadline. Faculty Supervisors will then be responsible for presenting the proposal and answering questions from the H195/196 Committee and, if the project is approved, for monitoring the student’s progress on a regular basis throughout the course. If you have 2 Supervisors for your H195, both should be involved in the proposal process. Coordinate with both of them early in the process.

Application Submission:

  • Honors Thesis and Production proposals are due in the spring of the previous academic year:
    • Draft of Proposal due to Faculty Supervisor: By 4pm on the second Friday of February (Submit by February 10, 2017)
    • Final Proposal due to Michael Mansfield: By 4pm on the Fourth Friday of February (Submit by February 24, 2017)
  • Honors Written Thesis-Only proposals:
    • For Spring Semester, application due to Michael Mansfield: By 4pm on the Third Friday of November (For Spring 2017, submit by November 18, 2016)
    • For Fall Semester, application due to Michael Mansfield: By 4pm on the Third Friday of April (For Fall 2017, submit by April 21, 2017)

Click here for more information

See the Theater 195A/B Application

THR 196

THEATER 196 – UNIVERSITY THEATER WORKSHOP

The 196 Project is a production project for the advanced directing or choreography or performance art student within the scope of a single semester. The 196 Project is not restricted to Theater and Performance Studies or Dance and Performance Studies Majors. Although undergraduate projects are given priority, graduate students may also apply for consideration. This four-unit, letter-graded course is possible in either the Fall or Spring Semester.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • Demonstrate experience and potential ability in the area of their proposed project
  • Minimum 3.3 GPA
  • Directing 196 Projects need to have completed 60: Introduction to Technical Theater & Production and 162: Directing before beginning the project
  • Choreography 196 Projects need to have completed 60: Introduction to Technical Theater & Production and 146B: Choreography before beginning the project
  • Other evidence of the student’s ability to assume the creative and administrative responsibilities of the 196 Project
  • Graduate students should provide information regarding previous coursework in the field of directing/choreography and get approval from your graduate advisor

Faculty Supervision:

Students are encouraged to start discussing projects (both the possibilities and the limitations of what you envision) with potential Faculty Supervisors as early as possible, normally in September or October. Students are required to submit and discuss a rough draft of their proposal with a Faculty Supervisor at least two weeks before the deadline for proposals. Faculty Supervisors will not sign proposals that have not been reviewed with them before the deadline. Faculty Supervisors will then be responsible for presenting the proposal and answering questions from the H195/196 Committee and, if the project is approved, for monitoring the student’s progress on a regular basis throughout the course. If you have 2 Supervisors for your H195, both should be involved in the proposal process. Coordinate with both of them early in the process.

Application Submission:

Submit production proposals in the spring for projects happening the following academic year:

Draft of Proposal due to Faculty Supervisor: By 4pm on the second Friday of February (Submit by February 10, 2017)

Final Proposal due to Michael Mansfield: By 4pm on the Fourth Friday of February (Submit by February 24, 2017)

Click here for more information

See the Theater 196 Application

THR 197

THEATER 197 – FIELD STUDY IN TECHNICAL THEATER

197 Field Study is an off-campus, supervised internship experience in theatrical production fields such as design and construction, stage management, publicity, and/or arts management, marketing, dramaturgy, and arts business fields, intended to prepare students for careers in the theater and dance professional worlds.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • Taken on a Pass/Not Pass basis (hence, does not fulfill TDPS minor requirement)
  • Course may be repeated
  • 1-4 units, computed on a unit representing 3 hours of work per week for 15 weeks
  • Internships are supervised by a faculty member in the student’s major department
  • Minimum 3.0 GPA
  • There are no summer internships
  • You cannot be paid for your internship
  • To enroll in Theater 197, you must have successfully completed 60 units
  • You may earn up to 16 units toward graduation for courses numbered 98, 99, 197, 198, and 199
  • You may not take more than 4 units of 98, 99, 197, 198, and/or 199 courses in any one semester

Faculty Supervision:

The intention of Theater 197 is to acquire experience and learning in the theater profession that is unavailable to you here at UCB in the same way. It is important that the internship not just be free labor, but rather, a fulfilling professional and educational experience. Since the Department gives credit for this experience, it is essential that both the On-Site Instructor and the UCB Faculty Supervisor understand the nature of the internship and take responsibility for its educational purpose. The more specific all three of you can be about the scope and the nature of the internship in advance, the more likely the internship will be successful. Lack of preparation often creates misunderstandings later, so the more attention each brings to this process in advance, the stronger the internship. We hope a secondary advantage of the internship will be the professional colleagues created. Coordinating this three-way partnership requires starting early.

Application Submission:

Third Friday of November for Spring Semester (For Spring 2017, submit by November 18, 2016)

Third Friday of April for Fall Semester. (For Fall 2017, submit by April 21, 2017)

Click here for more information

See the Theater 197 Application

THR 198

THEATER 198 – STUDENT-FACILITATED COURSES (TEACHING A DECAL)

Student-Facilitated Courses (DeCal -Democratic Education at CAL) courses are an important adjunct curriculum component to the TDPS departmental educational structure and across campus. Since 1965, students have shared their teaching skills and expertise in hundreds of courses offered each semester at UCB that otherwise would not be able to be taught. DeCal courses appear in the TDPS Departmental course listing, and for that semester, you are one of the course facilitators offering a class in our department under the mentorship of a supervising faculty member. The hope is that by teaching students will learn more about the educational profession and the ability to do research through teaching. Perhaps teaching will emerge as one of the interests you will be able to take with you into the next stage of your life and professional work. Teaching at UCB is not only a privilege, but also an amazing opportunity to develop as an artist and academic. The following procedures will maintain uniformity in the expectations and responsibilities assumed in offering these courses. It is up to the applicant and their faculty supervisor to turn in a complete application. All DeCal courses are taught as a Theater 98 course. The DeCal facilitator gets one unit of Theater 198 for their work as facilitator.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • Minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Major or Minor in TDPS, including having taken at least one course in the focus area that has prepared you to teach in the department
  • 1 unit for each student participant of Student-Facilitated Course Theater 98
  • 1 unit of Theater 198 (Student-Facilitated Course) for student facilitators
  • DeCal classes may not be used to fulfill major or minor requirements
  • DeCal courses are graded pass/no pass
  • DeCal courses may be facilitated by one or more students
  • Department offers a maximum of 4 of these courses per semester.

Faculty Supervision:

The sponsoring faculty member is the instructor of record. The paperwork to apply for this course and opportunity is substantial, and planning on the part of both student coordinator(s) and faculty is necessary. Start early. Student facilitator(s) and faculty should carefully read over the information on the Student-Facilitated Courses website.

See the Theater 198 Application

THR 99/199

THEATER 99/199 – INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent Study 199 is the opportunity for student(s) to set up a research/learning environment and mentor relationship with one faculty member to accomplish a learning objective of the student, pursuing a question in a research.

Faculty Supervision:

This is a course based on the development of the mentor relationship between student and faculty member. Start early in coordinating this learning opportunity.

Prerequisites/Rules:

  • 1-3 units, computed on a unit representing 3 hours of work per week for 15 weeks
  • Minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Taken on a Pass/Not Pass basis (hence, does not fulfill TDPS minor requirement)
  • Course may be repeated
  • You may earn up to 16 units toward graduation for courses numbered 98, 99, 197, 198, and 199
  • You may not take more than 4 units of 98, 99, 197, 198, and/or 199 courses in any one semester
  • To enroll in Theater 199, you must have successfully completed 60 units

Proposal Submission:

Third Friday of November for Spring Semester (For Spring 2017, submit by November 18, 2016)

Third Friday of April for Fall Semester (For Fall 2017, submit by April 21, 2017)

Click here for more information

See the Theater 99/199 Application

Production Participation

Productions in TDPS can take multiple forms, each being afforded specific resources of time and technical support. Below are explanations of four department rubrics in order of increasing time commitment for participants.

Workshops:

3 – 4 Units for Directors/Choreographers through THR H195 or THR 196 or THR 277
1 – 2 units for Participants through THR 171

  • Workshop productions are generated from 195/196/277 proposals, and the slots are available to graduate and undergraduate students on a competitive basis
  • Workshop productions have free admission.
  • 3 weeks of rehearsal (20-hours per week)
  • 1 night of staging in the space Tues
  • 2-performances Weds & Thurs
  • Running time: 60-75 minutes maximum
  • Approximately 2 workshop productions for student proposals per semester

As a step above class showings, students may apply for Workshops which are treated as staged readings/works/performances. Directors/Choreographers/Artists may audition students for participation and organized rehearsal time will be granted for up to 20 hours per week to be scheduled Monday – Friday. 

        Possible venues for Workshops include Z170, Room 7 and Durham Studio Theater determined by application criteria and schedule availability.

Technical/production support are as follows:

  • Workshops are student produced with the guidance of faculty and staff. They are focused on performance – technical support is negligible. There are no student running crews or stage managers.
  • Participants are encouraged to create an aesthetic for their performance through simple clothing choices and are asked to consider the overall aesthetic of the event in consultation with the Production Manager.
  • All costume elements desired are the responsibility of the student participants. The costume shop staff is not available to support workshop productions.
  • Students are encouraged to think about the audience experience from the time they enter the space until they depart and are responsible for setting up the venue, providing signage or program, and seeing that the event runs smoothly.
  • One technical staff person may be provided for three nights (staging and two performances) who will aid the students in setting light cues and sound levels and running the technical elements of the show. Students may make use of the rep light plots/area lighting and may have up to 8 lighting cues. Lighting in this context is meant to serve as a framework for the piece, establishing beginning and end, tone and passage of time. The lighting for Workshop productions is not intended to be full design. Similarly, sound may be used for pre and post-show music and a limited number of necessary internal cues.
  • Furniture and Props are the responsibility of the student participants. Timely requests for specific furniture items will be considered, though modification to any items will not be permitted.
  • Workshops require a Faculty Mentor.

Studio Productions

3 Units for Directors/Choreographers through THR 180, or 181
1 – 3 units for Participants through THR 180, or 181

  • 5 weeks of rehearsal (20-hours per week)
  • Technical rehearsals in the performance space
  • 5 performances – Thurs/Fri/Sat/Sat/Sun
  • Studio Productions are ticketed and have paid admission, and are included in the season brochure.
  • Running Time – 100 minutes maximum.

Technical/Production Support As Follows:

  • The H195/196/277 student serves as director/choreographer and also serves as producer, managing and allocating the modest budget for the show.
  • Studio Productions are staged in Durham Studio Theater or Room 7 and are intended to have student designers for Scenery, Costume, Lighting and Sound based on availability of students assigned to the project. Production Staff also provide mentorship and some direct support, though students are largely responsible for executing the required work.
  • Run Crew/Operators for Studio Productions provided through THR 60, 167, 169, 175A.
  • Taking undergraduate directing or choreography class is a prerequisite for proposers
  • Studio Productions requires a Faculty Mentor

Playhouse Productions

1 – 4 units for participants through THR 180 or 181

  • Playhouse Productions are selected by the Production Committee and not related to H195/196/277 proposals.
  • 5  weeks of rehearsal (24-hours of rehearsal per week)
  • 1week of technical rehearsals
  • 2 Weekends of performance with 3 shows per weekend
  • Playhouse Productions are only directed/choreographed by faculty and guest artists, with the possible exception of Berkeley Dance Project [BDP], which may be in a position to consider graduate student choreographers due to the nature of its structure.
  • Playhouse productions are generated through Production Committee solicitations and proposals.

Class showings  

Students receive units if enrolled in the course generating the showing. Additional participants do not receive units for performing in class showings.

Classes in acting, directing, playwriting and choreography may culminate in ‘showcase’ performances at the end of a semester. These are held in one of our performance or studio venues and may have basic lighting support in the form of a single cue or preset cues from an existing light plot. Students may solicit participation from friends and classmates in the performing of these works, though credit is not given to additional participants and rehearsal time is to be organized by the students independently. These showcase performances are further meant to have minimal technical elements such as costumes, props, etc. Anything desired and approved by the course instructor must be provided by the students, except in rare cases. Showcases are typically one or two performances.

Study Abroad

THEATER 113A – IRISH THEATER: ORIGINS AND CONTEMPORARY SCENE

The opportunity to study abroad creates an immersive university experience that integrates education and culture, preparing you for global citizenship in a vital way. All students at UCB are encouraged to consider doing some part of their education in this way. The Irish Theater Program allows you to study the theatrical literature of another country in that country while simultaneously training as an actor. For those students who do this course as Junior or Senior, it often becomes a great moment of synthesis for all of your Theater and Performance Studies work. Watch for more details for this program in Summer 2018.

Department Leadership

DEPARTMENTAL LEADERSHIP: STUDENT LIAISONS + PEER ADVISORS

Two departmental student leadership groups are part of the TDPS administrative team.

Peer Advisors work as resources to the Departmental Advising Team to welcome and support incoming students, answer questions and translate for visiting guests, families, and prospective students, and share information with current TDPS students as major social gatherings. These students work with Undergraduate Student Advisor Michael Mansfield. If you are interested, speak with Michael Mansfield in the Spring to apply.

Student Liaisons work to build a series of social functions during the year, attend meetings and serve on various departmental committees, and serve as a communication system between all parts of the TDPS community. These students work with the Vice Chair. A call for applications is announced in Spring semester each year.

Faculty Research Assistants

FACULTY RESEARCH ASSISTANTS

You may wish to work with a faculty member on their research projects. Often faculty members need assistance finding primary and secondary materials, collecting and analyzing data, or writing technical documents. As a faculty research assistant, you may experience the value of deep study and exploration into a topic that may be related to your own interests. Beginning a conversation, as early as possible, with the faculty member is the best way to initiate this process. Check out the campus website to discern next application submission opportunity. Undergraduate Research Assistance Program (URAP) pairs students with different faculty and new research projects each semester. Academic credit is available. http://urap/berkeley.edu

Other UCB Opportunities

OTHER UCB ADVANCED STUDY OPPORTUNITIES

UCB STUDY ABROAD COURSES

The Department encourages study abroad and hopes students take the opportunity to enrich their studies with this learning and cultural experience, whether on land or sea. While not always precisely a capstone course in our department, we highly recommend taking a summer, a semester, or a year abroad as part of your time here in our department. Check out the EAP website (Education Abroad Program – http://studyabroad.berkeley.edu) for the next application submission opportunity or check with the department to see when the next departmental course abroad will be offered. If students embark on a study abroad program during their junior or senior years, they can use that experience as a way to synthesize and deepen their explorations in their focus areas.

 

RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND INTERNSHIPS

Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF), Haas Scholars Program, Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowships, McNair Scholars Program, and the Judith Lee Stronach Baccalaureate Prize are just some of the many ways to pursue your own in-depth research and studies initiative with funding. These opportunities require an application process. See the UC Berkeley research website http://research.berkeley.edu and follow up leads for each group to receive detailed information on the next available application deadline.

 

UC BERKELEY WASHINGTON CENTER SEMESTER/CAL IN THE CAPITAL SUMMER INTERNSHIPS

Students live and study in Washington, DC for a semester or Sacramento, CA for a summer, participating in an internship in public service/non-profit centers. This could be particular interest to students focusing on arts policy or arts administration, or those hoping to combine theater with legal or governmental careers. Check the UC Berkeley website for more information.