Spring Courses

Please see below for Graduate Courses
See the Class Schedule for additional information

Please plan ahead to complete requirements as not all TDPS courses are offered every semester.

In Spring 2017 we will offer the following:

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

Courses required for our majors are offered at least once a year, in either Fall or Spring depending on faculty availability and departmental needs.  Given that the exact timing of required courses cannot always be predicted, students are strongly urged to take their requirements as early in their time in TDPS as possible.  Exceptions to the requirements will not be made.

Theater R1A (section 1) – Let’s Talk About Sex: Writing Sex in Performance, Health and Politics

GSI: Julia Havard, 4 units. Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.

Theater R1A (section 2) – Economic Dramas on Stage and Screen
Where do the majority of people, who might never take an economics class or go to business school, learn about economic issues? From where do many of us glean information about money, finance, inequality, debt, crisis, etc? One answer is from stories; those in the news as well as those in movies, novels, and theatrical productions. Indeed, when we are watching TV, or going to the theater, we are often learning about what to do (and what not to do) with money, more or less unknowingly. In this course we will look at how economic issues are represented and embodied in many different dramatic forms, from Broadway musicals, to Hollywood thrillers, TV serials and stage dramas. We will read and watch works from many regions of the world and historical periods. We will pay particular attention to how issues of class, wealth and poverty intersect with representations of race, gender and sexuality. This course fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement, and its main aim is to help us develop skills in close reading, critical analysis, and composition at the college-level.

GSI: Christian Nagler, 4 units. Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.

 Theater R1A (section 3) – Performance as a Political Act
This course fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement, and its main aim is to help you develop reading, critical analysis, and composition skills at the college-level. This course examines the role of performance in relationship to political and social movements from the 1960s to the present in the United States. Thinking historically to the present, we will analyze the divergent ways practitioners respond to social issues through the use of performance, ranging from dance to performance art to protest and so on. We will look to historical events, such as the AIDS crisis, as well as utilize keywords such as community, public, and activism as a way to think about the ways particular practices and historical lenses alter, distort, or challenge conventional definitions of these terms. Further, through the course we will build an active dialogue around the limits, potential, and efficacy of these practices through viewing and discussing work in the classroom, reading theoretical and artist authored texts, and engaging in writing exercises to help further our analysis and critical engagement of course material.

GSI: Randi Evans, 4 units. Prerequisites: R1A or its equivalent.

Theater R1B (sections 1) – Performance in and of Southeast Asian

In this course we will investigate performance as a theoretical lens, artistic medium, and everyday practice across Southeast Asia. Research and writing will draw upon theatre, dance, performance art, and ritual focusing on the construction of national and personal identity through performance. Through discussion, viewing, and frequent writing assignments we will hone our critical thinking skills and learn to formulate research questions and arguments that will culminate in a final research paper.

Instructor: Paige Johnson, 4 units. Prerequisites: R1A or its equivalent.

 Theater R1B (section 2) – Undocumented Subjects: Performance and Immigration in/outside the US
This course fulfills the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement, and its objective is to assist you develop critical, reading, analytical, and compositional skills in/outside the university. This course explores how performance practices and performance discourse intersect with immigration discourse in local, national, and international spheres. We consider how immigration discourses are staged by various subjects and institutions, and examine the visual, linguistic, and performative representations used. In particular, we analyze and write about performances that deal with issues about being undocumented. We will assess how writing about performance provides others frames for understanding the undocumented experience. We give attention to our writing in this course since we will be developing specialized skills and a language to talk about performance. Throughout the course we will discus the intersections of race, gender, and class within immigration. We will deal with literary and visual materials representing violence, death, and sex.

Instructor: Juan Manuel Aldape Munoz, 4 units. Prerequisites: R1A or its equivalent.

 Theater R1B (section 4) Writing About Performance
In this course we will investigate performance as a theoretical lens, artistic medium, and everyday practice. Research and writing will focus upon photography, ritual, sports, dance on film, and live theater. Through discussion, frequent writing assignments, and the texts of performance studies scholars, we will hone our critical thinking skills and learn to formulate productive topics, questions, and arguments. Students will attend on and off campus events, learn to evaluate sources, and develop various projects that will culminate in a final research paper.

Instructor: Michelle Summers, 4 units. Prerequisites: R1A or its equivalent.

Theater R1B (sections 5 and 6) Identity as Performance
In this course we will examine short stories, plays, articles, and films focusing on the construction of identity in relation with gender and performance.  We will explore how personal identity is not a concrete unchangeable idea, but is performed differently depending on the context and circumstances. This class will be an interdisciplinary and intersectional exploration of how presentations of the self in performance arts and in media, popular culture, etc. usually correspond with the expression of gender, sexuality, political opinion, and feminism.

Instructor: Srijani Ghosh, 4 units. Prerequisites: R1A or its equivalent.

Theater R1B (sections 8 and 9) – What a Body Can Do

Instructor: Sima Belmar, 4 units. Prerequisites: R1A or its equivalent.

Theater R1B (section 10) – Canceled

Theater 10 (section 1 – 4) – Introduction to Acting
This course is the entry level course for the acting sequence and focuses on releasing and cultivating the actor’s inherent creativity. Through exercises, improvisation, scenes, and monologues, the actor begins to develop basic techniques designed to stimulate the imagination, develop vocal and physical ability, increase awareness of self and others, introduce effective ways to analyze texts, think critically about the craft of acting, and enhance self-confidence and communication skills. This class is the essential beginning of the actor’s studies, which will ultimately allow her or him to effectively engage and explore work from a rich diversity of genres, styles, and backgrounds. An audition is required for admission to the class.  Sign-ups for auditions are available on-line at tdps.berkeley.edu (Callboard), and auditions are held at the beginning of the semester.  Audition requirements: a one-minute speech from a play, film or selection of prose.  Memorization is strongly encouraged.  Students accepted into the class will be given the course control number on the first day of class. 3 units.

There will be four sections to choose from:
Instructors: 1: Scott Wallin, 2: Domenique Lozano, 3: Scott Wallin, 4: Maura Tang

 Theater 25AC (section 1) – Drama of American Culture
This course will investigate values and issues fundamental to cultural identity, the comparison of selected cultural groups and their relationship to American society as a whole, and the study of drama as an instrument for understanding and expressing cultural identity.  The central investigative narrative will be the dramatic text and the author.  Students will read works from a cross section of influential American playwrights as Nilo Cruz, Suzan-Lori Parks, David Henry Hwang, Annie Baker, Naomi Iizuka. The material is drawn from contemporary canon with an emphasis on Professor Gotanda’s works and will allow for an inclusive culturally diverse engaging of the American play.  Study will be supplemented by video, guest lecturers in-class and by skype, in-class rehearsal demos and performances with actors, on-site visits to rehearsals-productions.   Professor Gotanda is currently working on several projects that will allow students real time participation in the theater processes:  Both Eyes Open (librettist), a chamber opera;  Hashtag:  Rohwer Arkansas, a short work for American Conservatory Theater and the Goethe Institute about technology and privacy; Sisters Matsumoto, a rehearsal and production with Center Repertory Theater in latter part of term.  The vantage point of Professor Gotanda as a playwright working in American theater will lend a living, in the field, dynamic to the class.  By the end of the course students will have engaged a selection of contemporary American works through reading, discussion, experiencing and performance.

Instructor: Philip Gotanda, 4 units. You must also sign up for a discussion session (no additional credit)

Theater 39 (section 1) – Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Movement, Awareness and Learning
How do we learn?  How do we learn to learn?  What do feeling, sensing, thinking, and doing have to do with learning? What does movement have to do with all of these?  (How) can one become more aware of oneself in movement?  This weekly seminar will have two parts:  during the first 50 minutes, you will do a Feldenkrais Method (R) Awareness-through-Movement lesson; then, after a short break, we will discuss the lesson and/or short readings tailored to your interests. You will be asked to do some light writing.  No previous experience with dance or Feldenkrais is required.    Open to the open-minded…

Instructor: Marianne Constable, 2 units

 Theater 40 – Introduction to Modern Dance Technique
This course is an introduction to modern dance. No prior dance experience is required. This beginning-level course will explore a variety of modern dance movement styles and develop basic technical skills. Special focus will be given to sound body alignment principles and the dynamic use of weight. We will also experiment with movement initiation, rhythmic awareness, using space, energy/dynamics, and self-expression. The course will further the student’s modern technique through movement, observation, analysis, and writing. Each class will consist of exercises that warm-up the body and build technical skills, followed by phrases that travel through space, and end with a longer combination of choreographed movement. Individual experimentation with movement concepts is highly encouraged and integral to the development of the dancer. This is the first level of modern dance technique taught in a four-level sequence. Regular attendance is required for this class. There is a required placement class on the first day of class. No special preparation is required, however students should be in good physical condition and feel comfortable moving with full effort. Footless tights, leotards, or fitted gym clothes are suggested attire.

Instructor: Latanya Tigner, 2 units

 Theater 60 – Introduction to Technical Theater and Production
A practical introduction to the terminology, theories, approaches, and techniques of technical theater and production. The course will cover theatrical terminology, stage equipment and architecture, production personnel and processes, and design departments, including: scenery, properties, costumes, lighting, sound, and video. The course has a laboratory component. Students will be assigned to work on departmental productions either as technical run crew or in department shops.

Instructor: Laxmi Kumaran, 4 units

 Theater 98 (section 1) – New Play Practicum
New Play Practicum is a directed group study course where students will form a repertory theater company dedicated to the production of four new play readings by up-and-coming playwrights. The New Play Repertory Company will be cast through open auditions in the early weeks of next semester and CCNs will then be distributed to participants. Meeting times will be communicated as soon as thy are known. Contact Martha Herrara-Lasso Gonzalez with questions: marthahl@berkeley.edu

Facilitators: Miyoko Conley, Christian Nagler, 1 unit

Theater 100 (section 1 and 2) – Collaborative Innovation
In this hands-on, project-based class, students will experience group creativity and team-based design by using techniques from across the disciplines of business, theatre, and art practice. They will leverage problem framing and solving techniques derived from critical thinking, systems thinking, and creative problem solving (popularly known today as design thinking). The course is grounded in a brief weekly lecture that sets out the theoretical, historical, and cultural contexts for particular innovation practices, but the majority of the class involves hands-on studio-based learning guided by an interdisciplinary team of teachers leading small group collaborative projects.

There are two sections of this course.
Instructors: 1. Lisa Wymore, 2. Sean San José; 4 units.

Theater 109 (section 1 and 2) – Fundamentals of Acting II
Fundamentals of Acting II continues working with and expands upon basic concepts introduced in Theater 10. Through exercises, improvisation, scenes and monologues, the actor works toward the goal of increasing range, depth and flexibility; students work on more complex texts, exploring characters removed from their everyday experience that require more in-depth research and stronger imagination to inhabit.

There are two sections of this course, both taught by Maura Tang; 3 units.

Theater 110B (section 1 and 2) – Intermediate Acting: Scene Study and Style
While continuing the work begun in TDPS 10 and 109, Scene Study and Style focuses on the actor’s relationship with multiple genres and forms of drama; increased focus is given to the specific demands and responsibilities of performing with heightened language and the complexities of characterization and style; emphasis is also given to achieving an understanding of dramatic action, developing technical proficiency and clarity, attaining emotional availability, and cultivating an enriched relationship with text. Through exercises, improvisation, scenes, and monologues, the actor learns how to transform intuitive creativity into performative excellence. Audition required for admission to the class. Sign-ups for auditions will be available on-line at tdps.berkeley.edu starting August 14, and auditions are held at the beginning of the semester. Audition requirements: a one-minute monologue from a play, which must be memorized. If you are accepted into the course, the instructor will give you a course control number on the first day your class meets.

There are two sections of this course.
Instructors: 1. Christopher Herold, 2. Domenique Lozano, 3 units

Theater 111 – Advanced Acting Studio
Advanced Acting Studio finishes the acting technique progression that begins with TDPS 10. Through scene-work, monologues, and exercises, the actor stretches and strengthens acting techniques, voice, movement, and speech; particular attention is given to character development and style; students also develop classical and contemporary audition material. Audition required for admission to the class. Sign-ups for auditions will be available on-line at tdps.berkeley.edu starting August 15 for Fall classes and December 1 for Spring classes and auditions are held at the beginning of the semester. Audition requirements: a one minute monologue from a play which must be memorized. If you are accepted into the course, the instructor will give you a course control number on the first day your class meets.

Instructor: Lura Dolas, 3 units

Theater 112 – Speech and Vocal Communication Skills
This course works to strengthen, support, and vary the quality of the natural voice through practice on basic relaxation techniques, breath, resonance, articulation, and projection. The course focuses on pitch, stress, rate, quality, and inflection through a variety of material and uses the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA-narrow transcription) to enhance clarity of speech. Students must attend the first class for interview and admission into the course.  A Course Control Number (CCN) will be distributed during that time.

Instructor: Lisa Anne Porter, 3 units

Theater 114 (Section 1) – Performance Workshop: Performing the 1960s
This class will stage a selection of significant writings of the 1960s in the US, to better grasp that profound, complex and influential decade. The class is based on the assumption that there are few better ways to understand a piece of writing than to embody it. We will read and perform every week – developing monologues, small scenes, and large ensemble pieces from the literature – working up to a final presentation we will curate from the semester’s explorations. It is important to recognize that so many of the crucial, progressive social movements of the present moment – such as Black Lives Matter, Occupy, and LGBTQ rights, to name a few – have roots in the movement culture of the 60s. We will read engage with notable fiction, non-fiction and poetry from the decade. Authors we look at will include, but not be limited to, the following (in alphabetical order): Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Truman Capote, Cesar Chavez, Joan Didion, Betty Friedan, Allen Ginsberg, Rodolfo Gonzales, Abbie Hoffman, Ken Kesey, Norman Mailer, Sylvia Plath, Luis Valdez, Kurt Vonnegut, Malcolm X. There is no audition required, and prior performance experience is not necessary. Grading will be based predominantly on the depth with which students engage with the materials in performance, plus short research assignments, and a 10-page process paper.

Instructor: Peter Glazer, 3 units

Theater 114 (Section 2) – Performance Workshop: Teatro Lab
Teatro 114 is an ensemble and seminar based course that offers both theater practice and reading/discussion around mainly, but not exclusively, Chicana/Latinx cultural production and performance. The course will include play texts, workshop, performance viewing, theory and analysis. This class is especially geared toward the thinking-artist who is interested in areas of directing, design, politics and/or facilitation for social change. Students will participate in on campus events, meet with emerging and established artists and producers, and will have an opportunity to develop a creative project or short scene to present at the end of the semester.

Instructor: Angela Marino, 3 units

Theater 119 – Dance, Sexuality and Gender
Performance theory plays an integral role in shaping our contemporary understandings of gender and sexuality. This course challenges students to think and write critically about dance in order to conceptualize performance as a living archive that shapes contemporary identities. Together, we will chart histories of gender and sexuality as they intersect with race, class, and nation. While no dance experience is necessary, this course will incorporate embodied practice and guest artists/ speakers as methods for engaging the material. Framing questions include: How does the minimalizing impulse of postmodern dance obscure readings of bodies as gendered or sexual? What are the effects of the feminization of ballet, and what are the attendant stakes for the male dancing body? How do Brazilian cultural understandings of gender and sexuality create a unique lens for viewing dance and martial arts forms as national identity on stage? And finally, how do issues of race intersect with gender and sexuality in African-American modern dance? In addition to attending four Cal Performances events, students will be asked to attend one additional performance of their choosing and conceptualize a final creative/written project that interrogates the fundamental questions presented in the course.

Instructor: Michelle Summers, 4 units

Theater 125 (Section 1) – Performance History – How to Be Alone: Solo Performance Past and Present
Sociologists have identified the 21st century as a new era of loneliness, pointing out that although we have more ways of communicating with each other than ever before (the telephone, email, Skype, etc) more and more people report feeling isolated and alone. This course will consider how Anglo-American cultures have defined and represented loneliness throughout history by considering how Anglo-American performers have presented loneliness onstage. How have theater practitioners past and present surmounted the challenges of representing loneliness in a theater crowded with people? How do innovations in communication technologies transform the ways that performers imagine and represent loneliness? When do cultures praise solitude as introspection, and when do they pathologize it as anti-social behavior, and how are these definitions influenced by assumptions about gender, race, mental illness, and normative behavior unique to certain eras, performers, or societies? We will begin with a discussion of the Vice character in medieval drama and in Marlowe and Shakespeare, then move on to an examination of normality and mental illness in the melodrama Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, in Adrienne Kennedy’s Funnyhouse of a Negro and in Sarah Kane’s 448 Psychosis; and conclude the semester with an exploration of technology and solitude with Samuel Beckett, Gertrude Stein, and more recent work on solitude and the internet.

Instructor: Julia Fawcett, 4 units.

Theater 125 (Section 2) – Performance History – Ballet History from the Renaissance through the 19th Century
In this class we explore ballet from its early incarnation as European political ritual through its development as professional theater. In addition to comparing and interpreting extant historical texts we will analyze and contextualize twentieth and twenty-first century reimaginings/reconstructions of period works– including popular ballets such as Coppelia, Giselle, Swan Lake and Sleeping Beauty. Course requirements: Attendance at all class meetings; regular reading and video viewing; one analytical essay; one midterm; and a cumulative final exam.

Instructor: Jenefer Johnson, 4 units.

Theater 126 (Section 1) – Performance Literatures – Greek Tragedy: Then and Now
In this course we shall read and discuss a selection of Classical Greek tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and at least one comedy by Aristophanes (The Frogs).  With the help of slides and videos, as well as the assigned readings, we’ll trace the evolution of Greek tragedy from its ritual beginnings, through its spread throughout the Hellenistic world, into the modern era, focusing on the role of theater in Athenian society, and ancient and modern views on the origins, value and effects of theatrical performance (Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, Turner, etc.).   We’ll also read some adaptations of Greek tragedies written by later playwrights:  Roman (Seneca), French (Racine, Anouilh), British, American (O’Neill, Mee), Japanese (Suzuki), and African (Soyinka, Fugard), and watch several video specimens of modern productions (in various styles and media), comparing these with what can be known about the original performance styles and techniques used in the ancient Theater of Dionysus.  All readings will be done in English.  Course requirements:  two short papers (4-6 pages); midterm exam (one hour); short on-line and in-class assignments; final exam (two hours).

Instructor: Mark Griffith, 4 units

Theater 126 (Section 2) – Performance Literatures – Staging California
This course takes our home state of California as the site through which to explore how cultural systems of performance help shape social systems of race.  We will consider the role a range of performance forms – theater, film, pageants, political protests – have played in shaping California’s unique cultural and racial topography.  From the theatricalization of Chinatown in Rodgers’ and Hammerstein’s Flower Drum Song to that of urban riots in Twilight, from the staging of farmworker’s rights to the configuration of the region by Disney in its state-themed park, performance strategies have been used by a variety of agents towards a wide range of social and political goals.  We will use the histories of play productions, films, and para-theatrical performances to interrogate conceptions of California as a “post-racial” state.

Instructor: Shannon Steen, 4 units

Theater 139B – Playwriting
This course will focus on the writing of a full-length theatrical work. A more critical analysis of the playwriting process with particular emphasis on how a playwright’s aesthetic and intellectual point of view inform the work. Instructor approval is a requirement for the course. Limited enrollment. To be considered for the course, submit a sample of creative writing (up to five pages) to the instructor by August 15 for Fall or January 10 for Spring (email: joeozu@berkeley.edu; mailbox located in 101 Dwinelle Annex). Include your name, year, major, phone number, and email address.

Instructor: Philip Kan Gotanda, 3 units

Theater 141 (section 1)- Intermediate Modern Dance Technique
This course is designed for students who wish to continue progressing through the TDPS dance technique sequence. Students with prior dance training will refine their dance skills and experience new kinesthetic challenges. Students will be exposed to a variety of modern dance styles and training practices. Students will continue to develop their basic dance skills by expanding their movement vocabulary, learning to work with different musical structures and tempos, developing more articulation in the body and clarity in movement. Students will be exposed to improvisational structures, partnering skills, inversions & floor work, Enrollment is decided by audition on the first day of class. The prerequisite for this course is Beginning Modern Dance Technique, Theater 40 or by audition.

Instructor: SanSan Kwan, 2 units

Theater 141 (section 2)- Intermediate Modern Dance Technique
This course is designed for students who wish to continue progressing through the TDPS dance technique sequence. Students with prior dance training will refine their dance skills and experience new kinesthetic challenges. Students will be exposed to a variety of movement styles from throughout the African Diaspora with an emphasis on Afro Cuban and Afro Brazilian Folkloric Dance and Capoeira. Students will learn basic history about these dance forms and experience how these movement forms can be integrated into Western Contemporary/Modern dance choreography. Students will continue to develop their basic dance skills by expanding their movement vocabulary, learning to work with different musical structures and tempos, develop more articulation and differentiation of body patterns, continue to be exposed to basic improvisational structures, learn basic partnering, and broaden their overall perspective of the wide range of movement forms that influence Western Contemporary/Modern Dance Technique. Enrollment is decided by audition on the first day of class. The prerequisite for this course is Beginning Modern Dance Technique, Theater 40 or by audition.

Instructor: Amara Tabor Smith, 2 units

Theater 142 – Advanced Modern Dance Technique

The primary goal of this course is to teach students how to use the training they received in Beginning (40A/B) and Intermediate (141A/B) Modern Dance Technique to transcend pure technical knowledge and become more fully realized dancers. To this end students will be asked to: learn longer dance combinations, dance with confidence and commitment, learn more complex floor patterns and rhythmic structures, learn through peer feedback, contribute compositional ideas to the class, and experience dance as performance. Students will continue to be exposed to dance improvisation and basic partnering. This is the third level of modern dance technique taught in a four-level sequence. Enrollment is decided by audition on the first day of class. The prerequisite for this course is Intermediate Modern Dance Technique, Theater 141 or by audition.

Instructor: Mo Miner, 2 units

 Theater 146B – Choreography: Group Forms
This course will cover basic strategies and methodologies for choreographing on small groups of dancers/performers. Compositional concerns will underlie all choreographic investigations, as will the connections of these formal concepts to content and meaning. By working with additional, participating dancers (chosen by audition early in the semester), student choreographers will develop effective means for directing dancers by practicing various modes of demonstration, communication, and collaboration. Additional attention will be paid to the practices of movement generation, creative problem solving, choreographic editing, sonic integration, and giving and receiving feedback. By working within explorations that are both rigorous and flexible, students will begin to identify the range of choreographic choices available to them, and will be asked to reflect on the nature of these devices within their own artistic concerns. Creative exercises will be supplemented by attending off campus performances, in-class video viewings, discussions, readings, and written reflections. It is required that students show their final choreographic works, created within the course, in the Choreography Workshop Production which is held at the end of the semester. Admission to this course is by consent of instructor only and priority is given to Dance and Performance Studies majors and minors. Students must have previously taken either Theater 144 Sources of Movement or 114 Performance Workshop: Somatics. Dancers who wish to be cast in the Choreography Workshop audition early in the semester. Visit D33 Hearst Field Annex when the semester starts for information. Dancers should hold the Thursday 1:00-3:30 timeframe for rehearsal. This course is a 3-unit course for choreographers and a 1-unit course for dancers.

Instructor: Katharine Faulkner, 1 or 3 units

 Theater 148 – Movement Improv

This course is an introduction to the foundational principles of movement improvisation. Through guided movement exercises and experiences, readings, discussions, observations, and journaling students will broaden their ability to move expressively and in the moment. They will learn skills that explore concepts of time, space, energy, shape and dynamics. The course will develop students’ choreographic tools and performance abilities, and it will challenge students to take creative risks. The readings will allow for critical and historical understandings of dance improvisation and how improvisation has impacted choreographic trends.

Instructor: Katharine Faulkner, 3 units

Theater 163 – Stage Directing
This course expands upon and further develops directing principles learned in Theater 162, Stage Directing: Fundamentals. Early scene work will include forms of theater that move beyond strict realism/naturalism. Scenes might be drawn from styles as wide-ranging as Greek drama, French neo-Classicism, Shakespeare, Restoration comedy, Brecht’s epic drama, or the Theater of the Absurd. We will focus on developing the directorial imagination, concept, dramaturgy, staging dynamics, and different manifestations of dramatic action. Students will read and analyze plays, participate in in-class workshops, direct at least one scene to be performed in class in the first half of the semester, and direct a final project of material each student will select and cast. These final scenes will be shown and critiqued in class, and then performed for the public as part of a scene showcase at the end of the semester. All interested students must attend the first class to be interviewed by the instructor for admission into the course. The course control number will be released once a class list has been determined. Prerequisite for this class is either Theater 162, equivalent training or experience as an actor or director, and/or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Chris Herold, 3 units 

Theater 166 – Undergraduate Research Seminar

Building upon students’ R1A and R1B writing courses and other TDPS coursework, the Undergraduate Research Seminar (URS) is designed to provide students at all levels with the knowledge and tools they need to conduct advanced research for honors theses, independent study research papers, essays, and synthesis papers. While the emphasis is on traditional scholarly research, practice-as- research is also covered in this course. With each student working with a familiar topic that they feel passionate about, we will practice skills such as crafting research questions, finding sources, engaging and responding critically to sources, identifying key concepts and conducting interviews. We will also draft a thesis statement and a paper outline based on the thesis statement. Final projects include the production of an annotated bibliography that includes a minimum of five sources and a research proposal in both written form and as a lively Pecha Kucha-like slideshow. Throughout the semester we will also practice project management including developing an idea of reasonable scale, sticking to research timelines and interacting with faculty advisors. Class format includes group instruction, peer review and one-on- one student advising. Class time will also be allotted to working on assignments.

While the URS is open to all students, it is required for TDPS students conducting departmentally–approved Honors Projects. Students are strongly encouraged to complete Theater 166 before proposing an Honors Project and to use the written research proposal completed in this class for the honors application process. TDPS students who must take the URS and the first semester of their “Written-Only” Honors Project concurrently have the option of dovetailing their final assignments for H195A and 166. The student may use their annotated bibliography in 166 as the foundation for the annotated bibliography required at the end of the first semester of their Honors Project 195A. They can also expand their thesis proposal in 166 into the ten-page proposal required in H195A to progress to the second semester of the Honors Project.

TDPS students who must take the URS while concurrently enrolled in the first semester of their “Honors Essay and Production” Honors Project have the option of substituting the introductory section of their 25-40 page Honors Project Essay for H195A for the written research proposal in 166. They may also use their second semester H195B Production Project as their topic for the end-of- the-semester slide show in 166.

Application: Enrollment is limited. To be considered for the course, please send an email to Jenefer Johnson at jenefer@berkeley.edu indicating your name, year, major, minor, and email address. If you have already been approved to do an Honors Project, please include a copy of your proposal. If you intend to apply for an Honors Project or independent study in the near future, please indicate the topic you are interested in researching. Pre-reqs: R1A and R1B or the equivalent.

Instructor: Jenefer Johnson, 2 units

Theater 167 Technical Theater: Performance Practice
Visit tdps.berkeley.edu/technical-production to read about course options and how to enroll. Theater 167 involves participation in technical theater practice associated with departmental theater and dance productions to include technical run crew for live performance in one of: lighting, sound, video, properties, costumes, make-up, scenery, deck, rail.

Instructor: Wil Leggett, 1 unit. CCN released upon admission. Pre-requisite: THR 60.

 Theater 168 Technical Theater: Shop Practice
Visit tdps.berkeley.edu/technical-production to read about course options and how to enroll. Theater 168 involves participation in technical theater practice associated with departmental theater and dance productions to include workshop activities (fabrication, treatment, and installation) in one or more of: costume, hair, make-up, scenery, properties, lighting, video, and sound for live performance.

Laboratory schedules are:
Scenery: M/W 2-5 or T/TH 2-5
Costumes: M/W 2-5 or T/TH 2-5
Lighting: T/TH 2-5 or W/F 2-5
Instructor: Wil Leggett, 2 units, CN provided upon admission. Pre-requisite: THR 60

 Theater 169 Advanced Technical Theater Practice
Visit tdps.berkeley.edu/technical-production to read about course options and how to enroll. Theater 169 involves participation in advanced technical theater practice associated with departmental theater and dance production to include lead, head, or coordinator position with technical run crew for live performance in one of: lighting, sound, video, properties, costumes, make-up, scenery, deck, rail or advanced application of workshop activities (fabrication, treatment, and installation) in one or more of: costume, hair, make-up, scenery, properties, lighting, video, and sound for live performance.  Intended for a student who has completed introductory level application of theater practice and is training in advanced techniques and applications and/or assuming additional responsibilities in relation to production.

Instructor: Wil Leggett, 1-3 variable units, CN provided upon admission.

 Theater 171 – Theater Performance: Audition Technique
Audition Preparation provides individual coaching for TDPS’s advanced acting students as they prepare for M.F.A. auditions; students develop and polish the necessary pairings of contrasting classical and contemporary monologues, resumes, and interview skills.

Instructor: Lura Dolas, time TBD with individual student, 1 unit, P/NP. CCN released upon admission.

 Theater 172 Advanced Production Study – Stage Management
This course is a practical introduction to the theory and execution of stage management for the theater. One major production assignment on a departmental production is required. There will be special emphasis on production organization and problem solving in connection with the production assignment dimension of the course. Prerequisite for this class is either Theater 60 or equivalent training or experience for transfer and exchange students.

Instructor: Laxmi Kumaran, 4-6 units

 Theater 173B – Scenography:  Scenic Design for the Theater
The fundamentals of performance design are explored through visual statements, simple technical drafting and model-making. Design for performance engages with text analysis, cultural research and thoughtful creativity and collaboration. The course will proceed through a variety of project foci as diverse as personal statement and classical text. Although previous studio art experience is helpful, all students are welcome. The student provides the majority of their project materials and is also responsible for contributing $12 for provided classroom project materials and tools.

Instructor: Annie Smart, 3 units

 Theatre 174B – Scenography: Costume Design for the Theater
This course continues teaching some fundamentals of costume design. Students will develop techniques that allow them to conceptualize, communicate and realize costumes successfully.  Design will be approached as an integration of all the performative tools – text, visuals, sound, etc – with particular focus on the scenographic role of the performer.  Students will design for movement and character; investigate the scenographic potential of costume in text and performance; research and design a portfolio of costumes for a classic play or opera.  Students who have completed Theater 174A, Introduction to Costume Design, will be given preference for enrollment but those new to costume design are welcome space permitting.

Instructor: Annie Smart, 3 units

 Theater 175B – Scenography: Lighting Design for the Theater
An exploration of the theory, process and practice of designing and executing stage lighting for theater and dance from the visualization of the initial concepts through the realization of those concepts on stage. At the end of the semester you will have the foundation for creating a lighting design and communicating that design to production team members. Vectorworks (a CAD program) will be utilized to draft a light plot. Lab hours are required. Prerequisite: 175A or instructor’s approval.

Instructor: Jack Carpenter, 4 units

Instructor: Abigail DeKosnik, 2 units

 Theater 177 – Sound Design and Media Theater


In this course, undergraduate students will learn to construct sound cues and soundtracks for theater performances and videos using industry standard software, and will learn fundamental principles of incorporating video and sound into stage productions. Students will be exposed to the writings and works of prominent sound theorists, designers, and engineers and multimedia performance artists. The most successful students may be invited to participate in UC Berkeley theater productions as sound designers.

Instructor: The Staff, 4 units

 Theater 180 – Theatrical Realization of Dance

This class is designed for students who are seriously interested in performing dance on the concert stage. Involvement prepares students to perform in a highly produced dance concert called the Berkeley Dance Project. The course is designed to teach students about the process of dancing for a choreographer. This will involve: participating fully in all rehearsals and all required performances, contributing ideas to the creative process, and being open to choreographic strategies and methods. Audition is required. CCN released after audition. See the Theater, Dance, and Performance website for exact dates of the Berkeley Dance Project.

Instructors: SanSan Kwan, 0.5-3 variable units

Theater 181 – Theatrical Realization of Dramatic Text
This class provides course credit for participation in the spring Playhouse Production of Polaroid Stories, directed by Margo Hall. Audition is required. CCN released after audition. See the Theater, Dance, and Performance website for exact dates of Polaroid Stories.

Instructors: Margo Hall, 1-4 variable units

Theater H195 A/B – Honors Thesis
Email Michael Mansfield at tdpsugadvisor@berkeley.edu to ask for a copy of the application. This is a two-semester written honors thesis, working in collaboration with one faculty member and a second faculty reader. This includes a first semester of research and a second semester of writing a thesis. Thesis proposal is due to Michael Mansfield by the first Friday in May to be reviewed for the following fall semester. 4 units each semester. CCN released upon approval.

 Theater 197 – Field Study (Internship)
Email Michael Mansfield at tdpsugadvisor@berkeley.edu to ask for a copy of the application. This is the opportunity to set up an unpaid internship with a Bay Area partner organization. Internship proposal is due to Michael Mansfield by the first Friday in May to be reviewed for the following fall semester. 1-4 variable units. CCN released upon approval.

 Theater 199 – Independent Study
Email Michael Mansfield at tdpsugadvisor@berkeley.edu to ask for a copy of the application. This is the opportunity to do a semester of research and study in the area of your choice, working in collaboration with a faculty member. Independent Study proposal is due to Michael Mansfield by the first Friday in May to be reviewed for the following fall semester. 1-3 variable units. CCN released upon approval.

GRADUATE COURSES

(Undergraduates, please note policy below about participation in graduate course.)

Theater 200B – Research Colloquium
The second semester of the Graduate Colloquium is required for first and second year graduate students in Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies. We will focus on professional development as well as the drafting of first and second year reviews. The seminar will in large part function as a writing workshop, where individual projects will be shared with the other students in the class for commentary and constructive critique.  In addition to required reviews, first year students will develop and complete a conference paper; second year students will prepare a literature review/review essay.

Instructor: Shannon Steen, 2 units

 Theater 201 – Performance Theory

Instructor: Abigail De Kosnik, 4 units

 Theater 203 – Performance Practicum: Lab Run
This course is constructed around the making of performance, culminating in Lab Run, a series of pieces created, directed, and/or performed by graduate students in the Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies. Lab Run will receive four public performances in Room 7 near the end of the semester. The course is also conceived as a forum for exploring the relationship between live performance and the critical discourses of Performance Studies. The first third of the semester will be spent discussing the purpose and parameters of Lab Run as a laboratory for performance practice and determining its content. Students will share materials with the rest of the class and/or make presentations to help develop ideas for individual projects and collaborations. We will also study a limited number of videos and selected essays to help enrich our critical vocabulary. As projects solidify, the class will determine a structure for the entire evening. Approximately mid-semester, rehearsal spaces will become available for students to continue the development of their pieces, and seminar hours will be substantially reduced. Once rehearsals begin, production meetings will be scheduled on a weekly basis with stage managers and other support staff. Participation in Theater 203 is required for first year graduate students in the Department of TDPS.

Instructor: Peter Glazer, 4 units

Theater 266 (section 1) – History and Theory of New Media
This graduate seminar is one of the core requirements for the Designated Emphasis in New Media, offered by the Berkeley Center for New Media.  This course will provide participants with a foundation in new media studies (major works, authors, historical events, objects, and schools of thought), such that they will be able to compile reading lists for their qualifying exams, bibliographies for their dissertations, and syllabi for their courses on topics related to new media.  It will develop participants’ skills in analyzing new media texts and artifacts, articulating their insights in speech and writing, and developing individual new media research projects.

Instructor: Abigail De Kosnik, 4 units

Theater 266 (section 2) – City, Arts and Public Spaces: Theories and Methods Across Disciplines

Local urban practices and artistic interventions are recreating public spaces in metropolises around the world. This graduate seminar draws from different methods across the humanities and environmental design to explore some of these interventions and to theorize about the public character of the transformations that they provoke. This course is part of an initiative that aims to connect different disciplines to produce new knowledge, methods, and pedagogies for the understanding of metropolises worldwide.

We will juxtapose different methodological and theoretical debates to address questions such as: how can we conceive of the public in cities connected globally by communication technologies? what are the spaces and mechanisms for contesting and reconfiguring these publics? what are the assumptions behind terms such as “global city,” “megacity,” and “world city”? how are cities branded, made into spectacles, and represented? what are the potentials and what are the limits of the “creative class” discourse in arts-based urban planning? how is civic inequality reproduced locally and transnationally? how do new urban practices and artistic interventions affect configurations of gender, race, and the representation of violence? how is precarity reproduced and aestheticized? These questions will be addressed through readings and the investigation of selected cases both in the Bay Area and internationally.

Throughout, students will be exposed to and critically consider different kinds of methodologies, including interview methods, observation, discourse analysis, formal analysis, archival research, and photography. In addition to the two instructors from different Colleges on campus, the course will invite visiting lecturers to join selected discussions that will be open to a wider public of faculty, students, and Bay Area colleagues. Some of the authors to be engaged during the course might include: Filip de Boeck, Teresa Caldeira, Néstor Garcia Canclini, Guy Debord, TJ Demos, Rosalind Deutsche, Jen Harvie, Jurgen Habermas, Shannon Jackson, Grant Kester, Miwon Kwon, Henri Lefebvre, Achille Mbembe, Sarah Nuttall, Jacques Rancière, Saskia Sassen, Rebecca Solnit, and Thomas Sugrue.

This core course is one of three required courses for the upcoming graduate certificate in Global Urban Humanities.  Applications for the certificate are expected to be available in Spring 2017, and students taking this course can count it toward a future certificate.

Instructors: Professor Teresa Caldeira (City Planning) and Professor Shannon Jackson (Theater, Dance and Performance Studies; Rhetoric; Arts Research Center), 4 units

Theater 266 (section 3) – Theorizing Black Performance

This course will explore recent developments in the field of black performance studies, in order to understand how performance functions as an analytic that helps us to theorize the imbrications of race with gender, sexuality, nation, and other categories of identity. Attending to both aesthetic performance and the role of performance in nontheatrical contexts, the texts under consideration will help to demonstrate the ways in which race—and especially blackness–persists as a structural determinant of possibility. Authors will include Stephanie Batiste, Simone Brown, Faedra Carpenter, Nicole Fleetwood, E. Patrick Johnson, Uri McMillan, Tavia Nyong’o, TC Roberts, C. Riley Snorton, and Harvey Young.

Instructor: Brandi Catanese, 4 units

 

POLICY ON UNDERGRADUATE PARTICIPATION IN GRADUATE COURSES

Graduate courses in Performance Studies are open to all qualified graduate students; however, unusually qualified undergraduate students may be eligible to take graduate seminars offered through the Graduate Group in Performance Studies.  Undergraduate students wishing to register for a graduate seminar must meet all of the following conditions:

For TDPS Majors:

a. have already taken the three required PS upper division courses, with a GPA of at least 3.6 average in those courses
b. have the prior written approval of the instructor, acknowledging that s/he has discussed the course with you, and has been informed of your background and GPA
c. understand that the graduate seminar is taken as an “elective”

For non-TDPS Majors

a. have a GPA of at least 3.6 average in relevant upper-division coursework in another department (i.e., formal courses in literature, history, theory, or cultural studies), and have taken at least three upper-division courses of this kind in the home department
b. have the prior written approval of the instructor, acknowledging that s/he has discussed the course with the student, and has been informed of his/her background and GPA

It is understood that in approaching an instructor for permission, the student will make his/her qualifications for the course (i.e. prior background and GPA) known to the instructor; students who have instructor approval but do not meet the GPA/background requirement will not be permitted in the course.

It is understood that the required classes for the Ph.D. in Performance Studies (200, 201, 202, 203) are normally closed to undergraduate students, as these courses play a crucial role both in professionalizing Ph.D. students and in providing them with a common critical vocabulary.