Fall Courses


Please plan ahead to complete requirements as not all TDPS courses are offered every semester.
Please see below for Graduate Courses
See the Class Schedule for additional information

TDPS Courses Offered in FALL 2017

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

Courses required for our majors are offered at least once a year, in either Fall or Spring depending on faculty availability and departmental needs. Given that the exact timing of courses cannot be predicted, students should take requirements as early in their time in TDPS as possible. Exceptions to the requirements will not be made.

Theater R1A (section 1) -Exploring Performance in Everyday Life  
This course fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement, and its primary aim is to help students develop critical reading, analytical, and academic writing skills. Using Media Studies and Performance Studies frameworks, this course examines how media and technology interact with memory. Intertwined with our daily lives, media not only reflect our experiences, but also actively shape how we remember events and construct our identities. How do media and technology shape our memory? How do we use media to build archives? How are our bodies intertwined in this process? Students will learn key concepts for media theory from a wide range of disciplines, and put these concepts in conversation with contemporary media objects, including film, TV, theatre, and digital platforms. We will also situate readings within broader historical discourses on media to consider how media history is constructed.

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Srijani Ghosh, Instructor of Record: Angela Marino, 4 units

Theater R1A (section 2) – Oil Culture
​This course fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement, and is designed to help students develop reading and composition skills at the university level. Throughout the course we will develop analytical skills by considering oil’s ubiquity in modern life. While oil is critical to the global economy and political relations between states, it is also profoundly cultural. This class is shaped by the knowledge that oil production has peaked, and that our characteristic mode of thinking about oil—that is, not thinking about it—will no longer suffice. Students will practice formulating a strong claim, selecting and incorporating evidence, and organizing an essay as we examine a range of novels, films, photographs, and performances in which petromodernity is described, such as in depictions of the Californian oil frontier in There Will be Blood and automobility in postwar conceptions of freedom. We will also examine the diverse forms of violence elicited by oil production by studying the protests against petro-imperialism at Standing Rock, and speculative futures of climate disaster.

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Kimberly Richards, Instructor of Record: Angela Marino, 4 units

Theater R1A (section 6) – Doing Gender: Representation, Identity and Performance – CANCELLED

 

Theater R1A (section 7) – Fatness and Popular Culture 
This course will look at the representation of fat bodies in popular culture to think critically about what messages our society sends us about fatness. We will analyze popular culture artifacts like television episodes, movies, films, songs, musicians and music videos, books, advertisements, and more and pair them with foundational theoretical readings in the nascent academic field of fat studies. We will be particularly interested in how the fat experience differs from body to body dependent upon race, gender, class, sexuality and sexual orientation and disability status.

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Caleb Luna, Instructor of Record: Angela Marino, 4 units

Theater R1A (section 9)- The Racialization of Sexuality

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Jessica Dorance, Instructor of Record: Angela Marino, 4 units

Theater R1B (section 1 & 2) – What a Body Can Do 
Researching and writing inside, hunched over a laptop, can be a lonely enterprise that also wreaks havoc on our bodies. In this course, we will spend one day per week “inside” the classroom and one day per week exploring a variety of “outsides”: campus quads and lawns, acting and dance classes, performance rehearsals, live performances, sporting events, and more. The course is designed for students to examine everyday and artistic performances as participant-observers in order to consider how we choreograph our humanity and explore the physical qualities of our contemporary moment. We will analyze movement as a broad category that plays a central role in how we “know” race, gender, sexuality, class, and disability. Taking our cue from the idea that “technique is knowledge that structures practice” (Spatz), we will explore the limitless question of what a body can do. Inside, we will discuss an eclectic assortment of theoretical texts from the fields of dance ethnography, performance studies, cultural studies, and philosophies of the body, as well as participate in classroom writing exercises that involve body-mind awareness practices derived from different somatic methods. As a research-focused R1B course, we will deploy the critical reading and analytical writing skills developed in R1A courses towards a final research project that will address the question of “what a body knows” in diverse historical contexts. 

Prerequisites: R1A or its equivalent.
GSI: Sima Blair, Instructor of Record: Angela Marino, 4 units

 

Theater R1B (section 3) – The Politics and Performance of AIDS

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Randi Evans, Instructor of Record:Angela Marino, 4 units

Theater R1B (section 4) – CANCELLED

 

Theater R1B (sections 5) – CANCELLED

 

Theater R1B (sections 6) – Writing About Performance  
In this course we will investigate performance as a theoretical lens, artistic medium, and everyday practice. Research and writing will focus upon photography, ritual, sports, dance on film, and live theater. Through discussion, frequent writing assignments, and the texts of performance studies scholars, we will hone our critical thinking skills and learn to formulate productive topics, questions, and analysis. Students will attend on and off campus events, learn to evaluate sources, and develop projects that will culminate in a final research paper.

Prerequisites: R1A or its equivalent.
GSI: Michelle Summers, Instructor of Record: Angela Marino, 4 units

Theater R1B (sections 7) – CANCELLED

 

Theater 5 – Public Speaking 

Students will learn to present themselves and material clearly, confidently, and persuasively, using age-old arts of oral communication. They will learn techniques for overcoming stage fright, developing clear enunciation, finding and using their natural, unaffected vocal register, varying tone and intonation to hold audience interest, controlling pacing, moving with assurance and purpose, using appropriate gestures, and eye contact as well as exploring methods to change behaviors that bar effective communication and structure speeches to maximize persuasiveness.

Instructor: TBA, 4 units

Theater 10 – Fundamentals of Acting I
Fundamentals of Acting I is the entry level course for the acting sequence and focuses on releasing and cultivating the actor’s inherent creativity. Through exercises, improvisation, scenes, and monologues, the actor begins to develop basic techniques designed to stimulate the imagination, develop vocal and physical ability, increase awareness of self and others, introduce effective ways to analyze texts, think critically about the craft of acting, and enhance self-confidence and communication skills. This class is the essential beginning of the actor’s studies, which will ultimately allow her or him to effectively engage and explore work from a rich diversity of genres, styles, and backgrounds. An audition is required for admission to the class.  Sign-ups for auditions are available on-line at tdps.berkeley.edu starting August 14, and auditions are held at the beginning of the semester.  Audition requirements: a one-minute speech from a play, film or selection of prose.  Memorization is strongly encouraged.  Students accepted into the class will be given the course control number on the first day of class. 3 units.

There are four sections of this course:
1: Margo Hall, 2: Margo Hall, 3: Maura Tang, 4: TBA

Theater 24: Freshman Seminar: Documentary Playmaking

8 Weeks starting 9/11/17

Instructor: Dunbar H. Ogden, 1 Unit 

Theater 26 (section 1)  – Introduction to Performance Studies
Why do you love performance? Do you feel like you have the vocabulary that you need to explain your passion to others? Do you feel like you know where your passion as an artist (or audience members) exists relative to other performance practices? What does it mean to pursue your passion within the liberal arts context of a big university? How do you explain to others that this is an academic discipline, not only an extracurricular activity?

Theater 26 is a class where you will learn about many different styles of performance, and how they are able to make an impact upon the world: not just to represent it, but to make it better—more beautiful, more filled with possibility, more just. In doing so, you will develop an analytical vocabulary that will serve you well within the Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies, but you will probably also find that it applies elsewhere too!

Instructor: Abigail De Kosnik, 4 units. You must also sign up for a discussion session (no additional credit).

Theater 39 (section 1) – Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Movement, Awareness and Learning
How do we learn?  How do we learn to learn?  What do feeling, sensing, thinking, and doing have to do with learning? What does movement have to do with all of these?  (How) can one become more aware of oneself in movement?  This weekly seminar will have two parts:  during the first 50 minutes, you will do a Feldenkrais Method (R) Awareness-through-Movement lesson; then, after a short break, we will discuss the lesson and/or short readings tailored to your interests. You will be asked to do some light writing.  No previous experience with dance or Feldenkrais is required.    Open to the open-minded…

Instructor: Marianne Constable, 2 units

Theater 39 (section 2) – Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Best Films 2016 and the Films that Influenced Them
In this seminar, we will watch the top 10+ movies of 2016 (according to my personal, subjective ranking) in conjunction with great films of the past that influenced them.  Every week, a 2016 film will be paired with an earlier film that bears some relation to it.  For instance, we will watch Moonlight in conjunction with Daughters of the Dust, The Handmaiden together with Bound, Arrival alongside Gravity, and so on.  Watching recent films with older films will allow us to identify the cinematic vocabularies, and the techniques in audiovisual storytelling, that characterize excellence in filmmaking and persist over time. 

Instructor: Abigail De Kosnik, 2 units

Theater 40 – Introduction to Modern Dance Technique
This course is an introduction to modern dance. No prior dance experience is required. This beginning-level course will explore a variety of modern dance movement styles and develop basic technical skills. Special focus will be given to sound body alignment principles and the dynamic use of weight. We will also experiment with movement initiation, rhythmic awareness, using space, energy/dynamics, and self-expression. The course will further the student’s modern technique through movement, observation, analysis, and writing. Each class will consist of exercises that warm-up the body and build technical skills, followed by phrases that travel through space, and end with a longer combination of choreographed movement. Individual experimentation with movement concepts is highly encouraged and integral to the development of the dancer. This is the first level of modern dance technique taught in a four-level sequence. Regular attendance is required for this class. There is a required placement class on the first day of class. No special preparation is required, however students should be in good physical condition and feel comfortable moving with full effort. Footless tights, leotards, or fitted gym clothes are suggested attire.

Instructor: SanSan Kwan, 2 units.

Theater 52AC – Dance in American Culture
This course fulfills the University American Cultures requirement, a breadth requirement that ensures that all UC Berkeley students are introduced to the diverse cultures of the United States through a comparative framework. In this course we view this diversity through the cultural practice of dance. We explore dance as a meaning-making expressive form. Over the term we will develop the tools necessary for looking at dance, analyzing it, writing about it, and understanding its place in larger social, cultural, and political structures. We will look at a variety of US American dance genres, understanding them through their historical and cultural contexts in order to explore how issues of race, gender, sexuality and class affect the practice and the reception of different dance forms, and, in turn, how dance might help shape representations of these identities. Ethnic groups that the course studies include African Americans, indigenous peoples of the United States, Asian Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, and European Americans. This course is designed to be accessible to students with no prior experience in dance. This is a not a studio-based dance class.

Instructor: SanSan Kwan, 4 units. You must also sign up for a discussion session (no additional credit).

Theater 60 – Introduction to Technical Theater and Production (formerly Stagecraft)
A practical introduction to the terminology, theories, approaches, and techniques of technical theater and production. The course will cover theatrical terminology, stage equipment and architecture, production personnel and processes, and design departments, including: scenery, properties, costumes, lighting, sound, and video. The course has a laboratory component. Students will be assigned to work on departmental productions either as technical run crew or in department shops.

Instructor: Laxmi Kumaran, 4 units

Theater 98/198 – Section 1 – New Play Practicum
Participate in the new play process! Auditions will take place in the third week and CCNs will then be distributed to participants.

Instructor: Miyoko Conley, Christian Nagler, Instructor of Record: Brandi Catanese 1 unit

DECAL CLASS Theater 98 (section 2) – You Too Can Learn Improv
Improv is a beautiful art to creativity, catharsis, and just all around better people. Not only that but sometimes it also leads to fame! Kristen Wiig, Will Ferrell, Bill Murray, and Tina Fey are only some of the big names that have come out of improv. This course will focus on learning the fundamentals of doing long form improv. Long form consists of creating a montage of scenes based on one simple audience suggestion.

Students will learn a wide variety of techniques used by UCB, Second City, iO, and The Annoyance Theatre. Using exercises, notes, and examples students will acquire the blueprints for a successful improv scene.

To pass, students must watch a total of 4 UCB improv shows online, attend a total of 4 on campus improv shows and write reflections on them, and complete the 3 readings that will be assigned.

Instructor: Adrian Ruvalcaba, Supervising Instructor: Maura Tang, 1 units

Theater 199 – Independent Study

Email Michael Mansfield at tdpsugadvisor@berkeley.edu to ask for a copy of the application. This is the opportunity to do a semester of research and study in the area of your choice working in collaboration with a faculty member. Independent Study proposal is due to Michael Mansfield by the first Friday in May to be reviewed for the following fall semester. 1-3 variable units.  CCN released upon approval.

Theater 109 – Fundamentals of Acting II 
Fundamentals of Acting II continues working with and expands upon basic concepts introduced in Theater 10. Through exercises, improvisation, scenes and monologues, the actor works toward the goal of increasing range, depth and flexibility; students work on more complex texts, exploring characters removed from their everyday experience that require more in-depth research and stronger imagination to inhabit.

There are two sections of this course.
Instructors: 1. TBA 2. Maura Tang, 3 units. 

Theater 110A – Intermediate Acting: Scene Study and Style
While continuing the work begun in TDPS 10 and 109, Scene Study and Style focuses on the actor’s relationship with multiple genres and forms of drama; increased focus is given to the specific demands and responsibilities of performing with heightened language and the complexities of characterization and style; emphasis is also given to achieving an understanding of dramatic action, developing technical proficiency and clarity, attaining emotional availability, and cultivating an enriched relationship with text. Through exercises, improvisation, scenes, and monologues, the actor learns how to transform intuitive creativity into performative excellence. Audition required for admission to the class. Sign-ups for auditions will be available on-line at tdps.berkeley.edu starting August 14, and auditions are held at the beginning of the semester. Audition requirements: a one-minute monologue from a play, which must be memorized. If you are accepted into the course, the instructor will give you a course control number on the first day your class meets.

There are two sections of this course.
Instructors: 1. Christopher Herold, 2. Domenique Lozano, 3 units

Theater 111 – Advanced Acting Studio
Advanced Acting Studio finishes the acting technique progression that begins with TDPS 10. Through scene-work, monologues, and exercises, the actor stretches and strengthens acting techniques, voice, movement, and speech; particular attention is given to character development and style; students also develop classical and contemporary audition material. Audition required for admission to the class. Sign-ups for auditions will be available on-line at tdps.berkeley.edu starting August 15 for Fall classes and December 1 for Spring classes and auditions are held at the beginning of the semester. Audition requirements: a one minute monologue from a play which must be memorized. If you are accepted into the course, the instructor will give you a course control number on the first day your class meets.

Instructor: Lura Dolas, 3 units

Theater 114 – Performance Workshop: Queer Movement Perspectives and Practices

Instructor: Joe Goode, 3 units

Theater 119 – Performance Theory: Theatrical Modernism
This course serves as a survey of experimental theater in the twentieth century.  What do we mean by the term “modernism” and what performance techniques were manifested within it? In this course, we will read and view a number of landmark performances from a variety of national contexts and theatrical traditions that have made a lasting impression on theater and drama of the last century, in order to explore thematic and formal engagements with modernism and its aftermath by directors, actors, playwrights, and choreographers who shaped contemporary performance.  We will concern ourselves primarily with the following dynamics: the rise of the director’s theater, the shift in acting style away from psychological realism, and the ongoing conversation between the performing and the visual arts that contributed to the unique innovations in performance and design.  Performances/texts will include: Anton Chekhov, The Cherry Orchard; “cabaret” theater (including the Futurists, the Dadaists); Eugene O’Neill, The Hairy Ape; Bertolt Brecht, Good Woman of Setzuan; Samuel Beckett, Endgame; Jean Genet, The Balcony; Jerzy Grotowski, Akropolis; Peter Weiss, Marat/Sade; The Performance Group,Dionysus in 69; DV8, Enter Achilles.

Instructor: Shannon Steen, 4 units

Theater 121  – Performance and Culture: Modernist Expressions: Early 20th Century Ballet and Modern Dance
In 1933, the New York Times dance critic, John Martin, opined: “The modern dance is not a system; it is a point of view.”  In this class we will examine the many competing points of view that fueled “modern” and/or modernist American and European concert dance during the first half of the twentieth century. Following a chronological trajectory we will begin with works by the interpretive dancers of the early 20th century (Loie Fuller, Isadora Duncan, etc.) and complete the semester with the self-reflexive modernist works of George Balanchine and Merce Cunningham. Focus will be on close readings of specific dances situated within their social and cultural contexts. Artists covered include Rudolph von Laban, Mary Wigman, Vaslav Nijinsky, Bronislava Nijinska, Leonide Massine, Martha Graham, Talley Beatty, Agnes de Mille, Jose Limon, Anna Sokolow, Pearl Primus, Donald McKayle, and Jerome Robbins.

Grades will be based on class participation (including short homework assignments), one paper, a midterm and a final exam.

Instructor: Jenefer Johnson, 4 units

Theater 125 – Performance/History – History of Celebrity
This course will examine the history of celebrity from its origins in pre-modern and early modern worship of gods, kings, and priests; to its use in 18th- and 19th-century nation-building; to Beyonce. Along the way, we’ll ask questions such as: Why do cultures need celebrities? What role do they fulfill in society? What makes celebrities so fascinating? (How, exactly, is a star born?) Do celebrities have the power to change society, or do they merely reflect and amplify values that are already there? (Can celebrity be subversive?) How can the virginity of Elizabeth I help us to understand the rise of Donald Trump? And what can we learn if we decide to take Kim Kardashian seriously? 

Instructor: Julia Fawcett, 4 units

Theater 126 – Social Movements and Migration in Latin American Theater
This class will examine the literary/drama works of primarily the western pacific of the North and South America to analyze performance in the context of migrational histories, mobilities and exile. Focusing on Mexico, the U.S. Southwest, and Chile, the footprints of generations of people that have left their mark in performance will be the source of inspiration in the material of this class through playwrights of both historical notoriety and contemporary relevance. From the Mexica performance of mitotes, and areitos to the prodigal nun, Juana Inés de la Cruz, to the contemporary dramas of Emilio Carballido, Egon Wolff, Sabina Berman, Culture Clash and the hybrid punk aesthetics of performance artists Asco and Guillermo Gomez Peña. Students will be introduced to a variety of contemporary stage performance in the U.S. southwest and Mexico, mainly in theatrical play texts as literary works in English translation, with some performance, plays and the novel The House of The Spirits by Isabel Allende in the Chilean context. We will also view some productions in class with opportunities for staged readings and short scene work. 

Instructor: Angela Marino, 4 units

Theater 139A– Fundamentals of Playwriting
A practical course for playwrights, both beginning and more advanced students. Through lecture, exercises, in class readings and group discussion, the class will explore the practical craft elements of playwriting along with the finding of personal voice in one’s work. Students will write two short plays during the semester. To be considered for the course, submit a sample of creative writing (up to five pages) by August 14 to the instructor’s mailbox in 101 Dwinelle Annex. Include your name, year, major, phone number, and email address. For those who miss the deadline, you are advised to attend the first class. Enrollment is limited.

Instructor: Philip Gotanda,  3 units

Theater 141– Intermediate Modern Dance Technique
This course is designed for students who wish to continue progressing through the TDPS dance technique sequence. Students with prior dance training will refine their dance skills and experience new kinesthetic challenges. Students will be exposed to a variety of modern dance styles and training practices with an emphasis on the study of  a variety of African diaspora movement forms with a concentration on Afro Cuban and Afro Brazilian Orisha dance and Capoeira. Students will continue to develop their basic dance skills by expanding their movement vocabulary, learning to work with different musical structures, poly rhythms and tempos, developing more articulation in the body and clarity in movement. Students will also be exposed to improvisational structures, inversions & floor work. Enrollment is decided by audition on the first day of class. The prerequisite for this course is Beginning Modern Dance Technique, Theater 40 or by audition.

Instructor: Amara Smith,  2 units

Theater 142– Advanced Modern Dance Technique
The primary goal of this course is to teach students how to use the training they received in Beginning (40A/B) and Intermediate (141A/B) Modern Dance Technique to transcend pure technical knowledge and become more fully realized dancers. To this end students will be asked to: learn longer dance combinations, dance with confidence and commitment, learn more complex floor patterns and rhythmic structures, learn through peer feedback, contribute compositional ideas to the class, and experience dance as performance. Students will continue to be exposed to dance improvisation and basic partnering. This is the third level of modern dance technique taught in a four-level sequence. Enrollment is decided by audition on the first day of class. The prerequisite for this course is Intermediate Modern Dance Technique, Theater 141 or by audition.

Instructor: James Graham, 2 units

Theater 144– Sources of Movement
This course introduces students to basic underlying sources and techniques necessary for creating dance choreography. It is open to non-majors and can be used to satisfy a pre-requisite for 146A Choreography. The curriculum consists of assignments that explore various processes for sourcing movement – whether that seed source comes from within the body/psyche or whether that source originates from without. In either case, the student will be creating movement and developing conceptual ideas into choreographic statements. Fundamental to this class is the notion that the body moves through space in dynamic ways – constantly changing patterns and shapes in relationship to the environment, community, and culture. It is a chance to begin to locate one’s own personal movement style. There are no prerequisites for this class. Students need to be present on the first day of class, or speak to the instructor in advance.

Instructor: Katie Faulkner, 3 units

Theater 146A– Choreography: Solo and Duet Forms
This course will focus on the creation of a solo/duet dance in the style of modern/contemporary concert dance. The beginning of the semester includes in-class exercises on the topics of: understanding form, structure, and use of space; phrasing; partnering; and developing choreographic strategies. The second part of the class involves auditioning dancers/performers for choreographic studies, setting outside rehearsal times and completing given choreographic assignments. The class concludes with a public showing of the dance piece created within the course.
Prerequisites: Sources of Movement: Theater 144 OR Performance Workshop: Somatics: Theater 114. Students may be concurrently enrolled in 144. It is highly recommended that students be enrolled in a dance technique class while taking this course. Enrollment is limited.
In the fifth week of the semester, choreographers will cast dancers to perform in their pieces. If you wish to be considered for this 1 unit of credit of 146A as a dancer, please keep your Thursday afternoon 2-4:30 slot open. As a choreographer, if you are cast in another choreographer’s piece, you will add a second course in the 5th week under a section of Theater 171.

Instructor: Joe Goode, 1-3 units (for the choreography students), 1 unit (for students dancing in the choreographic works – added in the 5th week)

Theater 151A – Theater History
A chronological survey of world theater to 1800, this course begins with an investigation of “performance behavior”–the human impulse to organize complex games, rituals, and other display activities. It explores the mythological and historical origins of theater in various cultures as well as the derivation of the first dramatic scripts. A heavy emphasis is placed on the analysis of the “promptbooks” and visual sources of early European and Asian theaters for a practical understanding of their scenic and acting styles.

Instructor: Julia Fawcett, 3 units

Theater 162– Fundamentals of Stage Directing

This course introduces students to the basic skills required of stage directors and trains them in their use. Emphasis will be placed upon script analysis and dramaturgy, communicating with actors and guiding them to effective choices and performances, use of space, blocking, and developing a concept. These topics will be examined through a combination of lectures, readings, in-class scene work and critiques, viewing plays, and conversations with visiting artists. Requirements will include directing and acting in scenes for the class, reading plays and essays, contributing to discussions, and brief weekly written critiques of a scene, reading, or play. Some degree of classroom training as an actor is considered a prerequisite for Theater 162. Students MUST attend the first class meeting for admission into the course, with no exceptions. Course control number released by instructor upon admission. This class is a prerequisite for the Spring class, Theater 163 – Advanced Directing.

Instructor: Peter Glazer, 3 units

Theater 166 (section 2) – Special Topics:  Independent Film Screenwriting—Investigating the personal aesthetic of storytelling.
The course investigates the development of an individualized film-aesthetic and how it informs the conceptual and dramatic point of view of the screenplay.  This will be done through lecture, screening of select films, discussion, and writing prompts.   Professor Gotanda will draw from his career as a playwright and indie filmmaker to build the curriculum.  At the core of the course will be the students’ understanding and development of an independent, highly specific, vocabulary for their telling of the story.  Rather than a course on how to write the next blockbuster movie, this class will ask:  If you are your own camera and an amalgam of intimate dramatic truths begin to speak in a visual narrative, what kind of film would your body make?

Instructor: Philip Gotanda, 4 units

Theater 166 (section 3) – Memory, Revival, and Hip-Hop: Dancing the African Diaspora
Students will experience how different traditional African and African diasporic dances show up in African American dance forms specifically Hip Hop and House will be examined. The course will examine how the movements from the African Diaspora are rejuvenated and revived as evidence of resilience, as acts of resistance, and as pathways to revelation within the field of dance and beyond. Nothing is ever new, especially in dance. Dances/steps within forms re-emerge and are re-visioned with new rhythmic structures, movement qualities, attitudes and intentions based on the lived experiences and needs of the generation responsible for their revival. Participants are welcome to share their personal observances of shared movement across forms. 

 
We will begin with a warm-up designed to get participants familiar with Central and West African movements, steps, and techniques. The course will focus on the movement origins of specific B-Boy steps and party/social dances from the 80s and 90s that fall under the umbrella of Hip Hop. The course will cover two main dance foci within the dances of Central and West Africa – the religious and the social.

Instructor: Latanya Tigner, 2 units

Theater 167– Technical Theater: Performance Practice
Hours to be arranged – email Wil Leggett, the Production Manager, at willeggett@berkeley.edu to receive syllabus, schedules, and enrollment forms. You may contact the Production Manager as early as the first week of the prior semester to be added to the waitlist for the following semester. Theater 167 involves participation in technical theater practice associated with departmental theater and dance productions to include technical run crew for live performance in one of: lighting, sound, video, properties, costumes, make-up, scenery, deck, rail.

Instructor: Wil Leggett, 1 unit. CCN released upon admission.

Theater 168 – Technical Theater: Shop Practice
Hours to be arranged – email Wil Leggett, the Production Manager, at willeggett@berkeley.edu to receive syllabus and enrollment forms. You may contact the Production Manager as early as the first week of the prior semester to be added to the waitlist for the following semester. Theater 168 involves participation in technical theater practice associated with departmental theater and dance productions to include workshop activities (fabrication, treatment, and installation) in one or more of: costume, hair, make-up, scenery, properties, lighting, video, and sound for live performance

Laboratory schedules are:
Scenery: M/W 2-5 or T/TH 2-5
Costumes: M/W 2-5 or T/TH 2-5
Lighting: T/TH 2-5 or W/F 2-5

Instructor: Wil Leggett, 2 units. CCN released upon admission.

Theater 169 – Advanced Technical Theater Practice
Hours to be arranged – email Wil Leggett, the Production Manager, at willeggett@berkeley.edu to receive syllabus and enrollment forms. You may contact the Production Manager as early as the first week of the prior semester to be added to the waitlist for the following semester. Theater 169 involves participation in advanced technical theater practice associated with departmental theater and dance production to include lead, head, or coordinator position with technical run crew for live performance in one of: lighting, sound, video, properties, costumes, make-up, scenery, deck, rail or advanced application of workshop activities (fabrication, treatment, and installation) in one or more of: costume, hair, make-up, scenery, properties, lighting, video, and sound for live performance.  Intended for a student who has completed introductory level application of theater practice and is training in advanced techniques and applications and/or assuming additional responsibilities in relation to production.

Instructor: Wil Leggett, 1-3 variable units. CCN released upon admission.

Theater 171 – (section 1) Theater Performance: Audition Technique
For the advanced actor preparing for the 2015 graduate school auditions. Participants work in individual coaching sessions with the instructor. Two-semester commitment required unless a December graduation is anticipated. Students are admitted by interview and with the recommendation of the acting faculty.  Limited enrollment. Those interested should watch for a sign-up sheet on the Dwinelle Annex hallway board in early September.

       Instructor: Lura Dolas, time TBD with individual student, 1 unit, P/NP. CCN released upon admission.

Theater 172– Stage Management
This course is a practical introduction to the theory and execution of stage management for the theater. One major production assignment on a departmental production is required. There will be special emphasis on production organization and problem solving in connection with the production assignment dimension of the course. Prerequisite for this class is either Theater 60 or equivalent training or experience for transfer and exchange students.

Instructor: Laxmi Kumaran, 4-6 units

Theater 173– Scenic Design for the Theater
This introductory course teaches some fundamentals of scenic design. Design for live performance will be approached as an integration of all the performative tools – text, visuals, sound, space, kinetics, etc – with particular focus in this class on the overall scenographic environment. Through personal development and group explorations students will be given basic conceptual and art-making tools allowing them to evolve, communicate and realize scenic and environmental solutions. Previous art training is helpful but not essential. The student must provide most art supplies.

Instructor: Annie Smart, 3 units

Theater 174– Costume Design for the Theater
This studio class explores some fundamental approaches and techniques for designing costume. Performance design will be approached as a product of all the performative tools and contexts – text, visuals, sound, space, kinetics, etc – with particular focus for this class on the scenographic role of the performer. Through personal expression and collaborative investigation students will be given some basic tools allowing them to conceptualize, communicate and realize costumes. Previous art training is helpful but not essential. The student must provide most art supplies.

Instructor: Annie Smart, 3 units

Theater 175A– Lighting Design for the Theater
This course will introduce you to the tools, terms, and techniques of stage lighting. Lectures cover explanations of lighting concepts and equipment. Working as part of a production crew will demonstrate those tools, terms, and techniques in their applications on stage. The goal of the course is to equip you with the skills needed to be an active participant in the production process while providing you with a background in the methods and materials of stage lighting as a foundation for the study of stage lighting design.

Instructor: Jack Carpenter, 4 units

Theater 176– Advanced Theatrical Design

Students of lighting design are provided experience, structure, and support in the practical application of design to the stage in departmental productions. Contact instructor for information about participation and course control numbers.

Instructor: Jack Carpenter, 1-3 variable units

Theater 177 – Sound Design and Media Theater
In this course, undergraduate students will learn to construct sound cues and soundtracks for theater performances and videos using industry standard software, and will learn fundamental principles of incorporating video and sound into stage productions. Students will be exposed to the writings and works of prominent sound theorists, designers, and engineers and multimedia performance artists. The most successful students may be invited to participate in UC Berkeley theater productions as sound designers.

Instructor: Michael St. Clair, 4 units

Theater 179 – Supervised Theatrical Design

Students who have taken TDPS design classes are offered opportunities to participate in practical scenographic explorations by taking responsibility for designing, or assistant designing department shows. This includes the designing of costumes, scenery, projections and special properties. The level of experience and commitment required varies so each project is tailored to the needs and abilities of each student and their particular production context. Contact instructor well in advance for information about participation and for CCN and other protocols.

Instructor: Annie Smart, 1- 3 units

 Theater 180 – Theatrical Realization of Dance

This class is designed for students who are seriously interested in performing dance on the concert stage. Involvement prepares students to perform in a highly produced dance concert called the Berkeley Dance Project. The course is designed to teach students about the process of dancing for a choreographer. This will involve: participating fully in all rehearsals and all required performances, contributing ideas to the creative process, and being open to choreographic strategies and methods. Audition is required. CCN released after audition. See the Theater, Dance, and Performance website for exact dates of the Berkeley Dance Project.

Instructors: Katie Faulkner, 0.5-3 variable units

Theater 181 – Theatrical Realization of Dramatic Text

There are two sections of this course.

Instructors: 1. Christopher T. Herold 2. Christine Nicolson, 1-4 variable Units

Theater H195A/B – Honors Thesis
Email Michael Mansfield at tdpsugadvisor@berkeley.edu to ask for a copy of the application. This is a two-semester written honors thesis, working in collaboration with one faculty member and a second faculty reader. This includes a first semester of research and a second semester of writing a thesis. Thesis proposal is due to Michael Mansfield by the first Friday in May to be reviewed for the following fall semester.  4 units each semester.  CCN released upon approval.

Theater 196 – Universal Theater Workshop

Instructor: TBA

Theater 199 – Independent Study
Email Michael Mansfield at tdpsugadvisor@berkeley.edu to ask for a copy of the application. This is the opportunity to do a semester of research and study in the area of your choice working in collaboration with a faculty member. Independent Study proposal is due to Michael Mansfield by the first Friday in May to be reviewed for the following fall semester. 1-3 variable units.  CCN released upon approval.

GRADUATE COURSES:

(Undergraduates, please note policy below about participation in graduate course.)

Theater 200A – Graduate Colloquium
This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the research resources of the University, to the methodologies and research interests of the faculty affiliated with the Ph.D. program, to the demands of a professional academic career, and to trends and developments in theater, dance, and performance studies.

Instructor: Brandi Catanese, 2 units

Theater 201A – Performance Theory
Part one of a two-semester core sequence on performance theory, required of first-year Performance Studies PhD students. This course focuses on the foundations of Performance Studies as a field, with special emphasis on its key philosophical and disciplinary antecedents. Topics will include the emergence of performance studies from the confluence of theater and literary studies, anthropology, art history, sociology, and cultural studies, and will include readings on central theoretical concepts such as performativity, the performance of everyday life, and the interventions of the 1990s regarding the role of performance in the formation of race, gender, sexuality, national identity, colonialism and more.

Instructor: Shannon Jackson, 4 units

Theater 266 (section 1) – Patriot Acts: Nation, Performance, Identity
This seminar will explore how public performances help individuals understand and define their relationship to the State. Whether singing national songs at sporting events (or not singing), valorizing or destabilizing national symbols, protesting and chanting on the streets and in the public square, or engaging in small, local celebrations around dates of significance or national holidays, individual identities as residents or citizens are tested and/or solidified through performance. Working from John Bodnar’s framing of official vs. vernacular performances (official as top-down, formal, dominant; vernacular as bottom-up, local, resistant) we will examine performances in a variety of national and regional contexts. When do individuals feel served and validated by official performances, and how do these performances work to accomplish nation building? By contrast, when do people feel the need to resist the official, national discourse with vernacular performances, and how can these help them build a sense of unity and belonging that may be counter to official constructions and mandates? 

Instructor: Peter Glazer, 4 units

Theater 266 (section 2)  History and Theory of New Media
This graduate seminar is one of the core requirements for the Designated Emphasis in New Media, offered by the Berkeley Center for New Media.  This course will provide participants with a foundation in new media studies (major works, authors, historical events, objects, and schools of thought), such that they will be able to compile reading lists for their qualifying exams, bibliographies for their dissertations, and syllabi for their courses on topics related to new media.  It will develop participants’ skills in analyzing new media texts and artifacts, articulating their insights in speech and writing, and developing individual new media research projects.

Instructor: Abigal De Kosnik, 4 units

 

Policy on Undergraduate Participation in Graduate Course

Graduate courses in Performance Studies are open to all qualified graduate students; however, unusually qualified undergraduate students may be eligible to take graduate seminars offered through the Graduate Group in Performance Studies.  Undergraduate students wishing to register for a graduate seminar must meet all of the following conditions:

For TDPS Majors:

a. Have already taken the three required PS upper division courses, with a GPA of at least 3.6 average in those courses.

b. Have the prior written approval of the instructor, acknowledging that s/he has discussed the course with you, and has been informed of your background and GPA.

c. Understand that the graduate seminar is taken as an “elective”.

For non-TDPS Majors

a. Have at least a 3.6 GPA in relevant upper-division coursework in another department (i.e., formal courses in literature, history, theory, or cultural studies), and have taken at least three upper-division courses of this kind in the home department.

b. Have the prior written approval of the instructor, acknowledging that s/he has discussed the course with the student, and has been informed of his/her background and GPA.

 

It is understood that in approaching an instructor for permission, the student will make his/her qualifications for the course (i.e. prior background and GPA) known to the instructor; students who have instructor approval but do not meet the GPA/background requirement will not be permitted in the course.

It is understood that the required classes for the Ph.D. in Performance Studies (200, 201, 202, 203) are normally closed to undergraduate students, as these courses play a crucial role both in professionalizing Ph.D. students and in providing them with a common critical vocabulary.