Fall Courses


Please plan ahead to complete requirements as not all TDPS courses are offered every semester.
Please see below for Graduate Courses
See the Class Schedule for additional information

TDPS Courses Offered in FALL 2016

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

Courses required for our majors are offered at least once a year, in either Fall or Spring depending on faculty availability and departmental needs. Given that the exact timing of courses cannot be predicted, students should take requirements as early in their time in TDPS as possible. Exceptions to the requirements will not be made.

Theater R1A (section 1) – Performance: Writing and Research: Media and Memory

This course fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement, and its primary aim is to help students develop critical reading, analytical, and academic writing skills. Using Media Studies and Performance Studies frameworks, this course examines how media and technology interact with memory. Intertwined with our daily lives, media not only reflect our experiences, but also actively shape how we remember events and construct our identities. How do media and technology shape our memory? How do we use media to build archives? How are our bodies intertwined in this process? Students will learn key concepts for media theory from a wide range of disciplines, and put these concepts in conversation with contemporary media objects, including film, TV, theatre, and digital platforms. We will also situate readings within broader historical discourses on media to consider how media history is constructed.

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Miyoko Conley, Instructor of Record: SanSan Kwan, 4 units

Theater R1A (section 2) – Performance: Writing and Research: Trans-ing queer theory – activism and performance in academic writing

In this course you will read a survey of queer of color and trans studies texts and learn how to critically apply them to investigate the cultural objects you see every day in your newsfeed. Queer of color critique and trans studies texts evolved in response to the field of queer studies and its limitations. These texts work to bring the complexity of racial and gendered difference into studies of sexuality. In this composition course, we will use this content as an entry point to develop writing skills, focusing on crafting and revising an argument. As this course is based on a performance studies framework, we will write not only about texts, but also cultural objects, such as social media, television, current events, porn, poetry, and film. Throughout the course, we will reflect on the relationship between activism and academia. What sort actionable impact can academic writing make? How the skills of argumentation, close reading, and critical analysis further social justice movement building? What is academic writing good for?

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Julia Havard, Instructor of Record: SanSan Kwan, 4 units

Theater R1A (section 6 — same as section 8) – Performance: Writing and Research: Identity as Performance
In this course we will examine short stories, plays, articles, and films focusing on the construction of identity in relation with gender and performance.  We will explore how personal identity is not a concrete unchangeable idea, but is performed differently depending on the context and circumstances. This class will be an interdisciplinary and intersectional exploration of how presentations of the self in performance arts and in media, popular culture, etc. usually correspond with the expression of gender, sexuality, political opinion, and feminism.

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Srijani Ghosh, 4 units

Theater R1A (section 7) – Performance: Writing and Research: Acts of Redress: War & Memory

This course fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement, and its main aim is to help students develop skills to perform close readings, critical analysis, and composition at the college-level. As a class, we will build a toolkit by examining visual media, memoirs, and performances on and off stage, to investigate how different memory making practices relate to experiences of war and trauma. How does memory affect the way we read, write, and experience the world? How can writing complicate the study of memory? What does embodied performance illuminate to us about memory processes? Students will practice how to record observations, construct a strong claim, and build a strong written argument.

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Natalia Duong, Instructor of Record: SanSan Kwan, 4 units

Theater R1A (section 8 — same as section 6) – Performance: Writing and Research: Identity as Performance

In this course we will examine short stories, plays, articles, and films focusing on the construction of identity in relation with gender and performance.  We will explore how personal identity is not a concrete unchangeable idea, but is performed differently depending on the context and circumstances. This class will be an interdisciplinary and intersectional exploration of how presentations of the self in performance arts and in media, popular culture, etc. usually correspond with the expression of gender, sexuality, political opinion, and feminism.

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Srijani Ghosh, 4 units

Theater R1A (section 9) – Performance: Writing and Research: Undocumented Subjects – Performance and Immigration in/outside the United States

This course fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement, and its objective is to assist you develop critical, reading, analytical, and compositional skills in/outside the university. This course explores how performance practices and performance discourse intersect with immigration discourse in local, national, and international spheres. We consider how immigration discourses are staged by various subjects and institutions, and examine the visual, linguistic, and performative representations used. In particular, we analyze and write about performances that deal with issues about being undocumented. We will assess how writing about performance provides others frames for understanding the undocumented experience. We give attention to our writing in this course since we will be developing specialized skills and a language to talk about performance. Throughout the course we will discus the intersections of race, gender, and class within immigration. We will deal with literary and visual materials representing violence, death, and sex.

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
GSI: Juan Aldape, Instructor of Record: SanSan Kwan, 4 units

Theater R1B (sections 1 and 2) – Performance: Writing and Research: Writing About Performance
In this course we will investigate performance as a theoretical lens, artistic medium, and everyday practice. Research and writing will focus upon photography, ritual, sports, dance on film, and live theater. Through discussion, frequent writing assignments, and the texts of performance studies scholars, we will hone our critical thinking skills and learn to formulate productive topics, questions, and arguments. Students will attend on and off campus events, learn to evaluate sources, and develop various projects that will culminate in a final research paper.

Prerequisites: R1A or its equivalent.
GSI: Michelle Summers, 4 units

Theater R1B (section 3 and section 5) – Performance: Inside Writing About Performance Outside
Researching and writing inside, hunched over a laptop, can be a lonely enterprise that also wreaks havoc on our bodies. In this course, we will spend one day per week “inside” the classroom and one day per week exploring a variety of “outsides”: campus quads and lawns, acting and dance classes, performance rehearsals, live performances, sporting events, and more. The course is designed to examine everyday and artistic performances as participant-observers to consider how we choreograph our humanity and explore the physical qualities of our contemporary moment. We will analyze movement as a broad category that plays a central role in how we “know” race, gender, sexuality, class, and disability. Inside, we will discuss an eclectic assortment of theoretical texts from the fields of dance ethnography, performance studies, cultural studies, and philosophies of the body, as well as participate in classroom writing exercises that involve body-mind awareness practices derived from different somatic methods. As a research-focused R1B course, we will deploy the critical reading and analytical writing skills developed in R1A courses towards a final research project that will address the question of “what a body knows” in diverse historical contexts.

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
Instructor: Sima Belmar, 4 units

Theater R1B (section 4) – Performance: Singing and Silence

Prerequisite: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.
Instructor: Thea Gold, Instructor of Record: SanSan Kwan, 4 units

Theater 5 – Public Speaking and Presentation Skills
Students will learn to present themselves and material clearly, confidently, and persuasively, using age-old arts of oral communication. They will learn techniques for overcoming stage fright, developing clear enunciation, finding and using their natural, unaffected vocal register, varying tone and intonation to hold audience interest, controlling pacing, moving with assurance and purpose, using appropriate gestures, and eye contact as well as exploring methods to change behaviors that bar effective communication and structure speeches to maximize persuasiveness.

Instructor: Lisa Anne Porter, 4 units

Theater 10 – Fundamentals of Acting I
Fundamentals of Acting I is the entry level course for the acting sequence and focuses on releasing and cultivating the actor’s inherent creativity. Through exercises, improvisation, scenes, and monologues, the actor begins to develop basic techniques designed to stimulate the imagination, develop vocal and physical ability, increase awareness of self and others, introduce effective ways to analyze texts, think critically about the craft of acting, and enhance self-confidence and communication skills. This class is the essential beginning of the actor’s studies, which will ultimately allow her or him to effectively engage and explore work from a rich diversity of genres, styles, and backgrounds. An audition is required for admission to the class.  Sign-ups for auditions are available on-line at tdps.berkeley.edu starting August 14, and auditions are held at the beginning of the semester.  Audition requirements: a one-minute speech from a play, film or selection of prose.  Memorization is strongly encouraged.  Students accepted into the class will be given the course control number on the first day of class. 3 units.

There are four sections of this course:
1: Margo Hall, 2: Margo Hall, 3: Scott Wallin, 4: Maura Tang

Fundamentals of Acting II (previously Theater 11) is now Theater 109

Theater 26 – Introduction to Performance Studies
What is performance? In the arts? In the social world? Do people only perform when they are onstage, or do they perform in everyday life as well? Under what circumstances do they do so? What do we mean when we say that a stock portfolio or an automobile performs well? How does one go about analyzing a performance, onstage or off? This course serves as an introduction to the fundamental concepts and practices of the contemporary study of performance. Together, we will explore a range of methods for discussing, analyzing, and understanding performance—methods drawn from anthropology and ethnography, from the theory of dance and theater, from literary and cultural theory. Through these methods, we will examine the ways performance negotiates a range of boundaries, between performers and audiences, among identities, and across the frontiers of global cultures. Throughout the semester, we will read performance and theoretical texts, view live and recorded performance, all while learning about and applying these theoretical concepts.

Instructor: Angela Marino, 4 units. You must also sign up for a discussion session (no additional credit).

Theater 40 – Introduction to Modern Dance Technique
This course is an introduction to modern dance. No prior dance experience is required. This beginning-level course will explore a variety of modern dance movement styles and develop basic technical skills. Special focus will be given to sound body alignment principles and the dynamic use of weight. We will also experiment with movement initiation, rhythmic awareness, using space, energy/dynamics, and self-expression. The course will further the student’s modern technique through movement, observation, analysis, and writing. Each class will consist of exercises that warm-up the body and build technical skills, followed by phrases that travel through space, and end with a longer combination of choreographed movement. Individual experimentation with movement concepts is highly encouraged and integral to the development of the dancer. This is the first level of modern dance technique taught in a four-level sequence. Regular attendance is required for this class. There is a required placement class on the first day of class. No special preparation is required, however students should be in good physical condition and feel comfortable moving with full effort. Footless tights, leotards, or fitted gym clothes are suggested attire.

There are four sections of this course:
1: James Graham, 2: Lisa Wymore, 2 units.

Theater 52AC – Dance in American Culture
This course fulfills the University American Cultures requirement, a breadth requirement that ensures that all UC Berkeley students are introduced to the diverse cultures of the United States through a comparative framework. In this course we view this diversity through the cultural practice of dance. We explore dance as a meaning-making expressive form. Over the term we will develop the tools necessary for looking at dance, analyzing it, writing about it, and understanding its place in larger social, cultural, and political structures. We will look at a variety of US American dance genres, understanding them through their historical and cultural contexts in order to explore how issues of race, gender, sexuality and class affect the practice and the reception of different dance forms, and, in turn, how dance might help shape representations of these identities. Ethnic groups that the course studies include African Americans, indigenous peoples of the United States, Asian Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, and European Americans. This course is designed to be accessible to students with no prior experience in dance. This is a not a studio-based dance class.

Instructor: SanSan Kwan, 4 units. You must also sign up for a discussion session (no additional credit).

Theater 60 – Introduction to Technical Theater and Production (formerly Stagecraft)
A practical introduction to the terminology, theories, approaches, and techniques of technical theater and production. The course will cover theatrical terminology, stage equipment and architecture, production personnel and processes, and design departments, including: scenery, properties, costumes, lighting, sound, and video. The course has a laboratory component. Students will be assigned to work on departmental productions either as technical run crew or in department shops.

Instructor: Laxmi Kumaran, 4 units

NEW Theater 84 – Sophomore Seminar: History and the Archive – The Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939

This class will utilize the Bancroft Library’s remarkable collection of materials related to this crucial event in 20th century political and cultural history, to help students learn how to use an archive for historical research. The Bancroft collection contains hundreds of items: posters, photographs, letters, albums, pamphlets, documents, physical objects, and publications, most generated during the conflict, many brought back from Spain by US volunteers themselves. It also houses the archive of the Bay Area post of the Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade (VALB), the collective name for the US volunteer contingent. Though most of the materials are in English, there are also a significant number of documents in Spanish, and some in Catalan. Students with knowledge of Spanish and/or Catalan would be welcome. This year, 2016, is the 80th anniversary of the start of the Spanish Civil War, and there will be a series of events on campus recognizing this commemorative year, to which students will be invited: film screenings, speeches, exhibits, poetry readings, and a theatrical performance of the musical, Heart of Spain. Each student will pursue a specific project of their own choosing, based on material in the archive, which will become the focus of their work during the semester.

Instructor: Peter Glazer, 1 unit

Theater 98/198 – Section 1 – New Play Practicum
Participate in the new play process! Auditions will take place in the third week and CCNs will then be distributed to participants.

Instructor: Miyoko Conley, Kim Richards, Christian Nagler, 1 unit

Theater 109 – Fundamentals of Acting II
Fundamentals of Acting II continues working with and expands upon basic concepts introduced in Theater 10. Through exercises, improvisation, scenes and monologues, the actor works toward the goal of increasing range, depth and flexibility; students work on more complex texts, exploring characters removed from their everyday experience that require more in-depth research and stronger imagination to inhabit.

There are two sections of this course.
Instructors: 1. Christopher Herold, 2. Lisa Porter, 3 units. 

Theater 110A – Intermediate Acting: Scene Study and Style
While continuing the work begun in TDPS 10 and 109, Scene Study and Style focuses on the actor’s relationship with multiple genres and forms of drama; increased focus is given to the specific demands and responsibilities of performing with heightened language and the complexities of characterization and style; emphasis is also given to achieving an understanding of dramatic action, developing technical proficiency and clarity, attaining emotional availability, and cultivating an enriched relationship with text. Through exercises, improvisation, scenes, and monologues, the actor learns how to transform intuitive creativity into performative excellence. Audition required for admission to the class. Sign-ups for auditions will be available on-line at tdps.berkeley.edu starting August 14, and auditions are held at the beginning of the semester. Audition requirements: a one-minute monologue from a play, which must be memorized. If you are accepted into the course, the instructor will give you a course control number on the first day your class meets.

There are two sections of this course.
Instructors: 1. Christopher Herold, 2. Domenique Lozano, 3 units

Theater 111 – Advanced Acting Studio
Advanced Acting Studio finishes the acting technique progression that begins with TDPS 10. Through scene-work, monologues, and exercises, the actor stretches and strengthens acting techniques, voice, movement, and speech; particular attention is given to character development and style; students also develop classical and contemporary audition material. Audition required for admission to the class. Sign-ups for auditions will be available on-line at tdps.berkeley.edu starting August 15 for Fall classes and December 1 for Spring classes and auditions are held at the beginning of the semester. Audition requirements: a one minute monologue from a play which must be memorized. If you are accepted into the course, the instructor will give you a course control number on the first day your class meets.

Instructor: Lura Dolas, 3 units

Theater 114 – Performance Workshop: “Asian American Theater Workshop”

This class is open to everyone.  There is no audition.  Formal training, experience performing, is not essential. The class will have two streams. The first is the collaborative reinvestigation, reimagining and rewriting of one of Professor Gotanda’s earliest works, The Dream of Kitamura. Students will research, take part in workshopping and give an informal presentation of the play. The second aspect of the class will be the reading, individual student presentations and class discussions of a selection of plays by Asian American artists. Works by Professor Gotanda and David Henry Hwang, as well as newer playwriting voices such as Hansol Jung, Mia Chung, Lauren Yee, and Young Jean Lee will be part of the curriculum. Activities may include attending performances and/or rehearsals of local theater productions. The investigation of these Asian American themed plays and their varied aesthetic points of view will inform the reimagining of Professor Gotanda’s The Dream Of Kitamura.

Instructor: Philip Gotanda, 3 units

Theater 119 – Performance Theory: Modernism and Beyond – Experimental Theater in the Twentieth Century
This course serves as a survey of experimental theater in the twentieth century.  What do we mean by the term “modernism” and what performance techniques were manifested through it? In this course, we will read and view a number of landmark performances from a variety of national contexts and theatrical traditions that have made a lasting impression on theater and drama of the last century, in order to explore thematic and formal engagements with modernism and its aftermath by directors, actors, playwrights, and choreographers who shaped contemporary performance.  We will concern ourselves primarily with the following dynamics: the rise of the director’s theater, the shift in acting style away from psychological realism, and the ongoing conversation between the performing and the visual arts that contributed to the unique innovations in performance and design.  Performances/texts will include: “cabaret” theater (including the Futurists, the Dadaists); Eugene O’Neill, The Hairy Ape; Bertolt Brecht, Good Woman of Setzuan; Samuel Beckett, Endgame; Jean Genet, The Balcony; Jerzy Grotowski, Akropolis; Peter Weiss, Marat/Sade; Peter Brook, The Empty Space; The Performance Group, Dionysus in 69; DV8, Enter Achilles; Pina Bausch, Café Müller and Rite of Spring; Charles Mee, Jr., Orestes.

Instructor: Shannon Steen, 4 units

Theater 121 (section 1) – Performance Culture: Contemporary Concert Dance, 1960 to the present. 
In this class we will situate close readings of ballet, modern, post modern and contemporary concert dance within cultural, political and historical contexts.  Foci may include identity, community, disability, transnationalism, collaboration, intertextuality, dance techniques, and choreographic processes. We’ll look at works by artists such as: Merce Cunningham, George Balanchine, Yvonne Rainer, Bill T Jones, Mark Morris, Lloyd Newson (DV8), Jawole Willa Jo Zollar (Urban Bush Women), Ushio Amagatsu (Sankai Juku), William Forsythe, Sasha Waltz, Ralph Lemon, Akram Khan and Jerome Bel. Grades will be based on class participation (including short homework assignments), one paper, a midterm and a final exam.

Instructor: Jenefer Johnson, 4 units

Theater 121 (section 2) – Performance Culture: Mapping Diasporas
How do we “map” cultures in diaspora? Describing the interaction of places, times, languages, identities, cultural formats, dominant and marginal narratives that characterize cultures in diaspora requires a multidimensionality that traditional maps no longer meet. In today’s world, we “map” diasporas through digital narratives, and often perform culture as archivists and curators. In this course, students will work with the cultural objects held in The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life, including art, material culture, books, manuscripts, digital assets and data, learning to conduct collaborative research and documentation, to create maps and narratives, and to curate and publish their findings in museum galleries and online.

Instructor: Francesco Spagnolo, 4 units

Theater 125 – Performance/History – Community Theaters
How does performance shape our understanding of urban spaces? How do the challenges of living in an urban environment—where streets are crowded, space is scarce, and real estate is pricey—force theater practitioners to innovate new spaces for performance or to transform old places into new purposes? In this course, we’ll explore how three very different cities—medieval York, Restoration London, and contemporary San Francisco—developed very different sorts of performances to address very different urban issues. At the same time, we’ll explore these performances as a way of mapping their communities—who is included, and who is excluded—as they negotiate through and around the communities’ contested spaces. In particular, we will examine how class considerations and the competition for space as a scarce urban resource has shaped the forms that performance has taken in medieval York, Restoration London, and contemporary San Francisco.

Instructor: Julia Fawcett, 4 units

Theater 126 – Black Performance

Instructor: Brandi Catanese, 4 units

Theater 139A– Fundamentals of Playwriting
A practical course for playwrights, both beginning and more advanced students. Through lecture, exercises, in class readings and group discussion, the class will explore the practical craft elements of playwriting along with the finding of personal voice in one’s work. Students will write two short plays during the semester. To be considered for the course, submit a sample of creative writing (up to five pages) by August 14 to the instructor’s mailbox in 101 Dwinelle Annex. Include your name, year, major, phone number, and email address. For those who miss the deadline, you are advised to attend the first class. Enrollment is limited.

Instructor: Philip Gotanda,  3 units

Theater 141– Intermediate Modern Dance Technique
This course is designed for students who wish to continue progressing through the TDPS dance technique sequence. Students with prior dance training will refine their dance skills and experience new kinesthetic challenges. Students will be exposed to a variety of modern dance styles and training practices with an emphasis on the study of  a variety of African diaspora movement forms with a concentration on Afro Cuban and Afro Brazilian Orisha dance and Capoeira. Students will continue to develop their basic dance skills by expanding their movement vocabulary, learning to work with different musical structures, poly rhythms and tempos, developing more articulation in the body and clarity in movement. Students will also be exposed to improvisational structures, inversions & floor work. Enrollment is decided by audition on the first day of class. The prerequisite for this course is Beginning Modern Dance Technique, Theater 40 or by audition.

Instructor: Latanya B. Tigner,  2 units

Theater 142– Advanced Modern Dance Technique
The primary goal of this course is to teach students how to use the training they received in Beginning (40A/B) and Intermediate (141A/B) Modern Dance Technique to transcend pure technical knowledge and become more fully realized dancers. To this end students will be asked to: learn longer dance combinations, dance with confidence and commitment, learn more complex floor patterns and rhythmic structures, learn through peer feedback, contribute compositional ideas to the class, and experience dance as performance. Students will continue to be exposed to dance improvisation and basic partnering. This is the third level of modern dance technique taught in a four-level sequence. Enrollment is decided by audition on the first day of class. The prerequisite for this course is Intermediate Modern Dance Technique, Theater 141 or by audition.

Instructor: Katie Faulkner, 2 units

Theater 144– Sources of Movement
This course introduces students to basic underlying sources and techniques necessary for creating dance choreography. It is open to non-majors and can be used to satisfy a pre-requisite for 146A Choreography. The curriculum consists of assignments that explore various processes for sourcing movement – whether that seed source comes from within the body/psyche or whether that source originates from without. In either case, the student will be creating movement and developing conceptual ideas into choreographic statements. Fundamental to this class is the notion that the body moves through space in dynamic ways – constantly changing patterns and shapes in relationship to the environment, community, and culture. It is a chance to begin to locate one’s own personal movement style. There are no prerequisites for this class. Students need to be present on the first day of class, or speak to the instructor in advance.

Instructor: Katie Faulkner, 3 units

Theater 146A– Choreography: Solo and Duet Forms
This course will focus on the creation of a solo/duet dance in the style of modern/contemporary concert dance. The beginning of the semester includes in-class exercises on the topics of: understanding form, structure, and use of space; phrasing; partnering; and developing choreographic strategies. The second part of the class involves auditioning dancers/performers for choreographic studies, setting outside rehearsal times and completing given choreographic assignments. The class concludes with a public showing of the dance piece created within the course.
Prerequisites: Sources of Movement: Theater 144 OR Performance Workshop: Somatics: Theater 114. Students may be concurrently enrolled in 144. It is highly recommended that students be enrolled in a dance technique class while taking this course. Enrollment is limited.
In the fifth week of the semester, choreographers will cast dancers to perform in their pieces. If you wish to be considered for this 1 unit of credit of 146A as a dancer, please keep your Thursday afternoon 2-4:30 slot open. As a choreographer, if you are cast in another choreographer’s piece, you will add a second course in the 5th week under a section of Theater 171.

Instructor: Joe Goode, 1-3 units (for the choreography students), 1 unit (for students dancing in the choreographic works – added in the 5th week)

Theater 162– Fundamentals of Stage Directing
This course introduces students to the basic skills required of stage directors and trains them in their use. Emphasis will be placed upon script analysis and dramaturgy, communicating with actors and guiding them to effective choices and performances, use of space, blocking, and developing a concept. These topics will be examined through a combination of lectures, readings, in-class scene work and critiques, viewing plays, and conversations with visiting artists. Requirements will include directing and acting in scenes for the class, reading plays and essays, contributing to discussions, and brief weekly written critiques of a scene, reading, or play. Some degree of classroom training as an actor is considered a prerequisite for Theater 162. Students MUST attend the first class meeting for admission into the course, with no exceptions. Course control number released by instructor upon admission. This class is a prerequisite for the Spring class, Theater 163 – Advanced Directing.

Instructor: Peter Glazer, 3 units

Theater 166 (section 1) – Making Sense of Cultural Data: Combining Humanities and Machine Learning Approaches to Analyze News, Film, Television and Social Media

“Making Sense of Cultural Data” is a seminar open to undergraduates and graduate students in Fall 2016 (undergraduates, see note below about how to apply).  This course will invite up to 15 upper-division undergraduates and 15 graduate students to form small (three- to five-person) research teams that formulate humanities-based research questions that they will answer by analyzing large news service databases, films and television series, and the social media platform Twitter.  Students will learn how to craft high-level humanities queries about cultural and social texts, how to design specific and effective queries for large databases of words and images, and how to link those two lines of investigation.  Students will collaborate with one another and with tool developers (whom I will invite as guests to the seminar) to conduct their data analyses and produce visualizations.  The student teams will then co-author  papers that they may consider submitting for conference presentations and/or journal publications.  With a Graduate Student Instructor, I will teach a curriculum that orients students to relevant humanities and data methods generally, and then will closely advise and guide student teams’ research projects, and facilitate their cooperation with tool developers.

Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must contact the instructor at adekosnik@berkeley.edu and either: a) state that they have already completed Data 8 (CS 8/Info 8/Stats 8), giving the semester they took the course and the grade they received, or b) obtain instructor approval to enroll.  To obtain instructor approval, undergraduates should submit a 1-page, single-spaced application to adekosnik@berkeley.edu stating their reasons for wanting to take the course and any background they have in data science or digital humanities.

Instructor: Gail De Kosnik, 4 units

Theater 166 (section 2) – Undergraduate Research Seminar
This Undergraduate Research Seminar is designed to give students the knowledge and tools they need to conduct advanced research for projects such as independent studies and honors theses. The class provides research skills relevant to both traditional scholarly research and practice-as-research projects. Building on students’ prior TDPS and R&C coursework, the course focuses on the development of research, writing, and presentation skills. Through group instruction, peer review, and one-on-one advising sessions, students move step-by-step through the research and writing process. Students will hone their research skills (crafting a research question, writing proposals, finding sources, engaging sources, planning and drafting reports) and project management skills (developing a project of reasonable scale, developing and sticking to research timelines, interacting with advisors and collaborators). This course is required for seniors who have departmentally approved honors theses; the course is recommended also for sophomores or juniors who are planning to do an honors project, capstone project or independent study later on in their student careers. All students will be expected to keep to a rigorous writing schedule that emphasizes the practical and playful aspects of research writing. Enrollment is limited. To be considered for the course, send an email to Jenefer Johnson at jenefer@berkeley.edu indicating your name, year, major/minor, phone number, and email address. If you have already been approved to do an honors thesis, please send a copy of your proposal. If you intend to apply for an honors project or independent study in future, please indicate what topic you are interested in exploring.

Instructor: Jenefer Johnson, 2 units

Theater 167– Technical Theater: Performance Practice
Hours to be arranged – email Wil Leggett, the Production Manager, at willeggett@berkeley.edu to receive syllabus, schedules, and enrollment forms. You may contact the Production Manager as early as the first week of the prior semester to be added to the waitlist for the following semester. Theater 167 involves participation in technical theater practice associated with departmental theater and dance productions to include technical run crew for live performance in one of: lighting, sound, video, properties, costumes, make-up, scenery, deck, rail.

Instructor: Wil Leggett, 1 unit. CCN released upon admission.

Theater 168 – Technical Theater: Shop Practice
Hours to be arranged – email Wil Leggett, the Production Manager, at willeggett@berkeley.edu to receive syllabus and enrollment forms. You may contact the Production Manager as early as the first week of the prior semester to be added to the waitlist for the following semester. Theater 168 involves participation in technical theater practice associated with departmental theater and dance productions to include workshop activities (fabrication, treatment, and installation) in one or more of: costume, hair, make-up, scenery, properties, lighting, video, and sound for live performance

Laboratory schedules are:
Scenery: M/W 2-5 or T/TH 2-5
Costumes: M/W 2-5 or T/TH 2-5
Lighting: T/TH 2-5 or W/F 2-5

Instructor: Wil Leggett, 2 units. CCN released upon admission.

Theater 169 – Advanced Technical Theater Practice
Hours to be arranged – email Wil Leggett, the Production Manager, at willeggett@berkeley.edu to receive syllabus and enrollment forms. You may contact the Production Manager as early as the first week of the prior semester to be added to the waitlist for the following semester. Theater 169 involves participation in advanced technical theater practice associated with departmental theater and dance production to include lead, head, or coordinator position with technical run crew for live performance in one of: lighting, sound, video, properties, costumes, make-up, scenery, deck, rail or advanced application of workshop activities (fabrication, treatment, and installation) in one or more of: costume, hair, make-up, scenery, properties, lighting, video, and sound for live performance.  Intended for a student who has completed introductory level application of theater practice and is training in advanced techniques and applications and/or assuming additional responsibilities in relation to production.

Instructor: Wil Leggett, 1-3 variable units. CCN released upon admission.

Theater 171 – (section 1) Theater Performance: Audition Technique
For the advanced actor preparing for the 2015 graduate school auditions. Participants work in individual coaching sessions with the instructor. Two-semester commitment required unless a December graduation is anticipated. Students are admitted by interview and with the recommendation of the acting faculty.  Limited enrollment. Those interested should watch for a sign-up sheet on the Dwinelle Annex hallway board in early September.

Instructor: Lura Dolas, time TBD with individual student, 1 unit, P/NP. CCN released upon admission.

Theater 172– Stage Management
This course is a practical introduction to the theory and execution of stage management for the theater. One major production assignment on a departmental production is required. There will be special emphasis on production organization and problem solving in connection with the production assignment dimension of the course. Prerequisite for this class is either Theater 60 or equivalent training or experience for transfer and exchange students.

Instructor: Laxmi Kumaran, 4-6 units

Theater 173A– Scenic Design for the Theater
This introductory course teaches some fundamentals of scenic design. Design for live performance will be approached as an integration of all the performative tools – text, visuals, sound, space, kinetics, etc – with particular focus in this class on the overall scenographic environment. Through personal development and group explorations students will be given basic conceptual and art-making tools allowing them to evolve, communicate and realize scenic and environmental solutions. Previous art training is helpful but not essential. The student must provide most art supplies.

Instructor: Annie Smart, 3 units

Theater 174A– Costume Design for the Theater
This studio class explores some fundamental approaches and techniques for designing costume. Performance design will be approached as a product of all the performative tools and contexts – text, visuals, sound, space, kinetics, etc – with particular focus for this class on the scenographic role of the performer. Through personal expression and collaborative investigation students will be given some basic tools allowing them to conceptualize, communicate and realize costumes. Previous art training is helpful but not essential. The student must provide most art supplies.

Instructor: Annie Smart, 3 units

Theater 175A– Lighting Design for the Theater
This course will introduce you to the tools, terms, and techniques of stage lighting. Lectures cover explanations of lighting concepts and equipment. Working as part of a production crew will demonstrate those tools, terms, and techniques in their applications on stage. The goal of the course is to equip you with the skills needed to be an active participant in the production process while providing you with a background in the methods and materials of stage lighting as a foundation for the study of stage lighting design.

Instructor: Jack Carpenter, 4 units

Theater H195A/B – Honors Thesis
Email Michael Mansfield at tdpsugadvisor@berkeley.edu to ask for a copy of the application. This is a two-semester written honors thesis, working in collaboration with one faculty member and a second faculty reader. This includes a first semester of research and a second semester of writing a thesis. Thesis proposal is due to Michael Mansfield by the first Friday in May to be reviewed for the following fall semester.  4 units each semester.  CCN released upon approval.

Theater 197 – Field Study (Internship)
Email Michael Mansfield at tdpsugadvisor@berkeley.edu to ask for a copy of the application. This is the opportunity to set up an unpaid internship with a Bay Area partner organization.  Internship proposal is due to Michael Mansfield by the first Friday in May to be reviewed for the following fall semester.  1-4 variable units.  CCN released upon approval.

Theater 199 – Independent Study
Email Michael Mansfield at tdpsugadvisor@berkeley.edu to ask for a copy of the application. This is the opportunity to do a semester of research and study in the area of your choice working in collaboration with a faculty member. Independent Study proposal is due to Michael Mansfield by the first Friday in May to be reviewed for the following fall semester. 1-3 variable units.  CCN released upon approval.

GRADUATE COURSES:

(Undergraduates, please note policy below about participation in graduate course.)

Theater 200A – Graduate Colloquium
This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the research resources of the University, to the methodologies and research interests of the faculty affiliated with the Ph.D. program, to the demands of a professional academic career, and to trends and developments in theater, dance, and performance studies.

Instructor: Shannon Steen, 2 units

Theater 202 – Methodologies in Performance Studies
This course on performance research methods will use two performances of and from the past as its case studies: one from the distant past (Restoration England) and one from the recent history of San Francisco. Though these performances seem disparate in time and place, our explorations will reveal important similarities between them—and the related methodologies we might use to study them. How, we’ll ask, can we reconstruct and interpret these ephemeral events from the texts, props, and settings that outlived them? How can we combine literary and historical with ethnographic methodologies in a way that is sensitive to our subjects and their cultures and eras—cultures and eras of which we might not be a part? What practices of performance theorists might aid us as historians, and which objects preserved in the archive can help us to understand the repertoire? How, in other words, does the performance of history help us to understand the history of performance—and vice versa?

Instructor: Julia Fawcett, 4 units

Theater 266 – Making Sense of Cultural Data: Combining Humanities and Machine Learning Approaches to Analyze News, Film, Television and Social Media
“Making Sense of Cultural Data” is a seminar open to undergraduates and graduate students in Fall 2016 (undergraduates will have to apply to the seminar by submitting a 1-page, single-spaced application stating their reasons for wanting to take the course and any background they have in data science or digital humanities).  This course will invite up to 15 upper-division undergraduates and 15 graduate students to form small (three- to five-person) research teams that formulate humanities-based research questions that they will answer by analyzing large news service databases, films and television series, and the social media platform Twitter.  Students will learn how to craft high-level humanities queries about cultural and social texts, how to design specific and effective queries for large databases of words and images, and how to link those two lines of investigation.  Students will collaborate with one another and with tool developers (whom I will invite as guests to the seminar) to conduct their data analyses and produce visualizations.  The student teams will then co-author  papers that they may consider submitting for conference presentations and/or journal publications.  With a Graduate Student Instructor, I will teach a curriculum that orients students to relevant humanities and data methods generally, and then will closely advise and guide student teams’ research projects, and facilitate their cooperation with tool developers.

Instructor: Gail De Kosnik, 4 units

Theater 266 – Awareness and Movement: Practice and Discussion
The seminar is open to students interested in exploring awareness, movement, and learning. Each class will generally consist of a Feldenkrais Method ® Awareness-through-Movement (ATM) lesson, followed by discussion of its relevance to and implications for learning, performing, and teaching. Students will be asked to reflect on their own experiences with the lessons and to relate such experiences to the concerns and interests in education and/or performance that they bring to the class. During the ATM lesson, attention is paid to oneself in place/space; to ease, timing, and range of movement; to habit and use of the self; self-image; breath; repetition and rest. Additional themes may include: learning to learn; feeling, sensing, thinking, and doing; intention, habit and strain; the “mind-body problem”; and other issues surrounding “somatics,” “body-conscious learning” or “voice,” On-time arrival and participation in the ATM lessons, as well as participation in discussions, some light reading, and a short written assignment, will be required. NOTE: Course may be repeated for credit. Students interested in more focused or intensive reading concerning the themes above should sign up for an additional unit through Rhetoric 244 (see below). Marianne Constable is Professor of Rhetoric and a certified Feldenkrais Method ® practitioner.

Instructor: Marianne Constable, 1 unit

 

Policy on Undergraduate Participation in Graduate Course

Graduate courses in Performance Studies are open to all qualified graduate students; however, unusually qualified undergraduate students may be eligible to take graduate seminars offered through the Graduate Group in Performance Studies.  Undergraduate students wishing to register for a graduate seminar must meet all of the following conditions:

For TDPS Majors:

a. Have already taken the three required PS upper division courses, with a GPA of at least 3.6 average in those courses.

b. Have the prior written approval of the instructor, acknowledging that s/he has discussed the course with you, and has been informed of your background and GPA.

c. Understand that the graduate seminar is taken as an “elective”.

For non-TDPS Majors

a. Have at least a 3.6 GPA in relevant upper-division coursework in another department (i.e., formal courses in literature, history, theory, or cultural studies), and have taken at least three upper-division courses of this kind in the home department.

b. Have the prior written approval of the instructor, acknowledging that s/he has discussed the course with the student, and has been informed of his/her background and GPA.

 

It is understood that in approaching an instructor for permission, the student will make his/her qualifications for the course (i.e. prior background and GPA) known to the instructor; students who have instructor approval but do not meet the GPA/background requirement will not be permitted in the course.

It is understood that the required classes for the Ph.D. in Performance Studies (200, 201, 202, 203) are normally closed to undergraduate students, as these courses play a crucial role both in professionalizing Ph.D. students and in providing them with a common critical vocabulary.